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Concord is located at 43°12′24″N 71°32′17″W  /  43.20667°N 71.53806°W  / 43.20667; -71.53806 (43.2070, −71.5371).
According to the United States Census Bureau , the city has a total area of 67.5 square miles (174.8 km 2 ). 64.2 square miles (166.4 km 2 ) of it is land and 3.2 square miles (8.4 km 2 ) of it is water, comprising 4.79% of the city. Concord is drained by the Merrimack River . Penacook Lake is in the west. The highest point in Concord is 860 feet (260 m) above sea level on Oak Hill, just west of the hill's 970-foot (300 m) summit in neighboring Loudon .
Concord lies fully within the Merrimack River watershed , and is centered on the river, which runs from northwest to southeast through the city. Downtown is located on a low terrace to the west of the river, with residential neighborhoods climbing hills to the west and extending southwards towards the town of Bow. To the east of the Merrimack, atop a 100-foot (30 m) bluff, is a flat, sandy plain known as Concord Heights, which has seen most of the city's commercial development since 1960. The eastern boundary of Concord (with the town of Pembroke ) is formed by the Soucook River , a tributary of the Merrimack. The Turkey River winds through the southwestern quarter of the city, passing through the campus of St. Paul's School before entering the Merrimack River in Bow. In the northern part of the city, the Contoocook River enters the Merrimack at the village of Penacook. Other village centers in the city include West Concord (actually north of downtown, on the west side of the Merrimack) and East Concord (also north of downtown, but on the east side of the Merrimack).
The city's neighboring communities are Bow to the south, Pembroke to the southeast, Loudon to the northeast, Canterbury , Boscawen , and Webster to the north, and Hopkinton to the west.
Did You Know

QuestionIn the United States, the term 'full trailer'is usedfor a freight trailer supported by front and rear axles and pulled by a drawbar. This term isslightlydifferent in Europe, where a full traileris knownas an A-frame drawbar trail. A full trailer is 96 or 102 in (2.4 or 2.6 m) wide and 35 or 40 ft (11 or 12 m) long.

QuestionThe Motor Carrier Act, passed by Congress in 1935, replace the code of competition.The authorization the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) place was to regulate the trucking industry. Since then the ICC has been long abolished,however, it did quite a lot during its time.Based on the recommendations given by the ICC, Congress enacted the first hours of services regulation in 1938. This limited driving hours of truck and bus drivers.In 1941, the ICC reported that inconsistent weight limitation imposed by the states cause problems to effective interstate truck commerce.

QuestionThe decade of the 70s saw the heyday of truck driving, and the dramatic rise in the popularity of "trucker culture". Truck drivers were romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws (and this stereotype persists even today). This was due in part to their use of citizens' band (CB) radio to relay information to each other regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. Plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and using CB slang were popular not just with drivers but among the general public.

QuestionBusiness routes always have the same number as the routes they parallel. For example, U.S. 1 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, U.S. Route 1, and Interstate 40 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, Interstate 40.

QuestionThe American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO)was organizedand founded on December 12, 1914.On November 13, 1973, the namewas alteredto the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials.This slight change in name reflects a broadened scope of attention towards all modes of transportation.Despite the implications of the name change, most of the activities itis involvedin still gravitate towards highways.

QuestionThroughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route mostcommonlyused on an alternative routing of a highway around a town.Specificallywhen the main route of the highway goes through the town.Originally, these routeswere designatedas "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns.However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass".Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.