First American Van Lines

USDOT # 907280
2600 Vegas Dr
Las Vegas, NV 89180
Las Vegas
Nevada
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (702) 982-5385
Company Site: www.firstamericanvanlinesinc.com

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We've used them once before, were impressed with the first move they did for us. First American is professional, great customer service and gives fair pricing . Highly recommended!

Did You Know

QuestionAll cars must pass some sort of emission check, such as a smog check to ensure safety.Similarly, trucks are subject to noise emissionrequirement, which is emanating from the U.S. Noise Control Act. Thiswas intendedto protect the public from noise health side effects.The loud noise is due to the way trucks contributedisproportionatelyto roadway noise.This isprimarilydue to the elevated stacks and intense tire and aerodynamic noise characteristics.

QuestionSignage of business routes varies, depending on the type of route they are derived from. Business routes paralleling U.S. and state highways usually have exactly the same shield shapes and nearly the same overall appearance as the routes they parallel, with a rectangular plate reading "BUSINESS" placed above the shield (either supplementing or replacing the directional plate, depending on the preference of the road agency). In order to better identify and differentiate alternate routes from the routes they parallel, some states such as Maryland are beginning to use green shields for business routes off U.S. highways. In addition, Maryland uses a green shield for business routes off state highways with the word "BUSINESS" in place of "MARYLAND" is used for a state route.

Question

In the United States, commercial truck classificationis fixed byeach vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8.Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty.The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks.Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS,formerlyknown as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

Question

Truckload shipping is the movement of large amounts of cargo.In general, they move amounts necessary to fill an entire semi-trailer or inter-modal container.A truckload carrier is a trucking company that generally contracts an entire trailer-load to a single customer. This is quite the opposite of a Less than Truckload (LTL) freight services.Less than Truckload shipping services generally mix freight from several customers in each trailer.An advantage Full Truckload shipping carriers have over Less than Truckload carrier services is that the freight isn't handled during the trip.Yet, in an LTL shipment, goods will generallybe transportedon several different trailers.

Question

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry.There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine.Improvement in transmissions is yet another source,justlike the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.
The first state weight limits for truckswere determinedand put in place in 1913.Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads.As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and amaximumspeed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks tomostlyurban areas.