American Eagle Van Lines

USDOT # 256825
126 S 5th STREET
Norfolk, NE 68701
Norfolk
Nebraska
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (402) 500-3100
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Did You Know

QuestionTrucks of the era mostly used two-cylinder engines and had a carrying capacity of 1,500 to 2,000 kilograms (3,300 to 4,400 lb). In 1904, 700 heavy trucks were built in the United States, 1000 in 1907, 6000 in 1910, and 25000 in 1914. A Benz truck modified by Netphener company (1895)

QuestionThe interstate moving industry in the United States maintains regulation by the FMCSA, which is part of the USDOT.With only a small staff (fewer than 20 people) available to patrol hundreds of moving companies, enforcement is difficult.As a result of such a small staff, there arein many cases, no regulations that qualify moving companies as 'reliable'. Without this guarantee, it is difficult to a consumer to make a choice. Although, moving companies can provide and often display a DOT license.

QuestionDOT officers of each state are generally in charge of the enforcement of the Hours of Service (HOS). These are sometimes checked when CMVs pass through weigh stations. Drivers found to be in violation of the HOS canbe forcedto stop driving for a certain period of time. This, in turn, maynegativelyaffect the motor carrier's safety rating. Requests to change the HOS are a source of debate. Unfortunately, many surveysindicatedriversroutinelyget away with violating the HOS.Such facts have started yet another debate on whether motor carriers shouldbe requiredto us EOBRs in their vehicles.Relying on paper-based log books does not always seem to enforce the HOS law put in place for the safety of everyone.

QuestionWords have always had a different meaning or havebeen usedinterchangeablywith others across all cultures.In the United States, Canada, and the Philippines the word "truck" ismostlyreserved for larger vehicles.Although in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, the word "truck" is generally reserved for large vehicles. In Australia and New Zealand, a pickup truck is usually called a ute, short for "utility". While over in South Africa it is called a bakkie (Afrikaans: "small open container").The United Kingdom, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Ireland, and Hong Kong use the "lorry" instead of truck, but only for medium and heavy types.

QuestionThe term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry.This is where the wordis knownto havebeen usedin 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage)specificallya large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin.It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911.Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry"was usedfor a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.