Moovers of KC North, LLC

USDOT # 2862072
4201 NE 34th St.
Kansas City, Missouri 64117
Kansas City
Missouri
Contact Phone: 1 800 MOOVERS
Additional Phone: (816) 595-2101
Company Site: www.1800moovers.com

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Did You Know

QuestionIn 1999, The Simpsons episode Maximum Homerdrive aired. It featured Homer and Bart making a delivery for a truck driver named Red after he unexpectedly dies of 'food poisoning'.

Question"Six Day on the Road" was a trucker hit released in 1963 by country music singer Dave Dudley. Bill Malone is an author as well as a music historian.He notes the song "effectivelycaptured both the boredom and the excitement, as well as the swaggering masculinity that often accompanied long distance trucking."

QuestionTrucks and cars have much in commonmechanicallyas well asancestrally.One link between them is the steam-powered fardier Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built it in 1769. Unfortunately for him, steam trucks were notreallycommon until the mid 1800's. While looking at thispractically, it would be much harder to have a steam truck. This ismostlydue to the fact that the roads of the timewere builtfor horse and carriages. Steam truckswere leftto very short hauls, usually from a factory to the nearest railway station.In 1881, the first semi-trailer appeared, and it was in fact towed by a steam tractor manufactured by De Dion-Bouton.Steam-powered truckswere soldin France and in the United States,apparentlyuntil the eve of World War I. Also, at the beginning of World War II in the United Kingdom, theywere knownas 'steam wagons'.

QuestionThe term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry.This is where the wordis knownto havebeen usedin 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage)specificallya large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin.It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911.Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry"was usedfor a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.

QuestionTracing the origins of particular words can be quite different with so many words in the English Dictionary.Some say the word "truck" might have come from a back-formation of "truckle", meaning "small wheel" or "pulley". In turn, both sources emanate from the Greektrokhos(τροχός), meaning "wheel", fromtrekhein(τρέχειν, "to run").