Customer Satisfaction


  • Are they fully licensed and insured?Check with the FMCSA and the USDOT, as well as Moving Authority.
  • Have all the line items of the contract been explained in detail before you are encouraged to sign?
  • Have previous customers said good things about these movers Kansas City MO?
  • Do these movers Kansas City seem to understand the practices and customs of the moving industry very well?
  • Do these Kansas City Missouri movers have their tariff readily available for you to see?
  • Are the Kansas City movers clean-cut, in uniform, and energetic?

Have the Best Day in Kansas City — Without Spending an Arm and a Leg

  • Head to the Bruce R. Watkins Cultural Heritage Center to see new exhibitions.
  • Drop by the Children’s Peace Pavilion for hands-on activities for kids of all ages.
  • Ride through town on the KC Streetcar.
  • Cool off in one of the famous fountains that Kansas City has open to the public.
  • Indulge your artistic side at Kaleidoscope, a free art studio.

4 Steps for Taking Control of Your Move

  • Pack Like A Pro. Learn proper packing techniques in order to save you time, effort, and money.
  • Get the Right Tools. When you are moving Kansas City furniture or large items, it’s imperative that you use the proper equipment so that your things—and you—make it to the destination in one piece.
  • Understand the Types of Moves. Are you moving your home? Your business? Both? It’s important to learn what type of move you have in order to get the best possible estimate from moving companies in Kansas City.
  • Narrow Down a Budget. This is the key to having a successful move. If you pay too little for Kansas City moving companies, you run the risk of compromising the safety of your possessions. Know your budget and resist the temptation to skimp on the prices.

The Top Five Places You MUST Get BBQ in Kansas City

  • Joe’s Kansas City BBQ. Housed inside of a gas station with a line that snakes around the building before the place even opens, it doesn’t get more authentic than this.
  • Jack Stack BBQ. Not just ribs! At Jack Stack, you can get any kind of meat you want in BBQ form.
  • Arthur Bryant’s BBQ. With an unassuming self-service style, you can get your BBQ with the no-frills classics of Wonder bread and fries.
  • B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ. Sit outside and enjoy smoked meat swimming in sauce with blues crooning in row background.
  • Q39. This high-ceilinged hipster joint is your stop for getting your BBQ before it was cool.

Did You Know

QuestionA commercial driver's license (CDL) is a driver's license required to operate large or heavy vehicles.

QuestionIn many countries, driving a truck requires a special driving license. The requirements and limitations vary with each different jurisdiction.

QuestionTrucks and cars have much in commonmechanicallyas well asancestrally.One link between them is the steam-powered fardier Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built it in 1769. Unfortunately for him, steam trucks were notreallycommon until the mid 1800's. While looking at thispractically, it would be much harder to have a steam truck. This ismostlydue to the fact that the roads of the timewere builtfor horse and carriages. Steam truckswere leftto very short hauls, usually from a factory to the nearest railway station.In 1881, the first semi-trailer appeared, and it was in fact towed by a steam tractor manufactured by De Dion-Bouton.Steam-powered truckswere soldin France and in the United States,apparentlyuntil the eve of World War I. Also, at the beginning of World War II in the United Kingdom, theywere knownas 'steam wagons'.

QuestionA relatable reality t.v. show to the industry is the show Ice Road Truckers, which premiered season 3 on the History Channel in 2009. The show documents the lives of truck drivers working the scary Dalton Highway in Alaska. Following drivers as they compete to see which one of them can haul the most loads before the end of the season.It'll grab you with its mechanical problems that so many have experienced and as you watch them avoid the pitfalls of dangerous and icy roads!


The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry.There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine.Improvement in transmissions is yet another source,justlike the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.
The first state weight limits for truckswere determinedand put in place in 1913.Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads.As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and amaximumspeed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks tomostlyurban areas.