Jordan Transfer Inc

USDOT # 87835
224 Bugg St
West Point, MS 39773
West Point
Mississippi
Contact Phone: (800) 748-8685
Additional Phone: (662) 494-2871
Company Site: www.atlasvanlines.com/movers/mississippi-ms/west-point-ms/1226/jordan-transfer-co-inc/

Moving with Jordan Transfer Inc

Understanding the needs of the client is of great importance for most all movers, like here at Jordan Transfer Movers in MS.
Jordan Transfer Movers in MS can transmit your property in your your new home from your sure-enough office to your stain new seat.
clients have also disclosed to us that Jordan Transfer Movers in MS is the most effective in this territory. Take our Jordan Transfer Movers in MS reviews below for verification.




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I am a veteran of 10 military moves and the packing job by this company was beneath the benchmarks I have encountered. Double check the nature of padding for key things. I additionally had a few things damaged in this move and I should document my first claim in 20 yrs of moving with the military.

Did You Know

Question

The trucking industry has made a large historical impact since the early 20th century. It has affected the U.S. bothpoliticallyas well aseconomicallysince the notion has begun.Previous to the invention of automobiles, most freightwas moved bytrain or horse-drawn carriage. Trucks were firstexclusivelyused by the military during World War I.
After the war, construction of paved roads increased. As a result, trucking began to achieve significant popularity by the 1930's.Soon after trucking became subject to various government regulation, such as the hours of service.During the later 1950's and 1960's, trucking accelerated due to the construction of the Interstate Highway System.The Interstate Highway System is an extensive network of freeways linking major cities cross country.

QuestionIn 2009, the book 'Trucking Country: The Road to America's Walmart Economy' debuted, written by author Shane Hamilton. This novel explores the interesting history of trucking and connects certain developments.Particularly how such development in the trucking industry have helped the so-called big-box stored. Examples of these would include Walmart or Target, they dominate the retail sector of the U.S. economy. Yet, Hamilton connects historical and present-day evidence that connects such correlations.

Question“The association of truckers with cowboys and related myths was perhaps most obvious during the urban-cowboy craze of the late 1970s, a period that saw middle-class urbanites wearing cowboy clothing and patronizing simulated cowboy nightclubs. During this time, at least four truck driver movies appeared, CB radio became popular, and truck drivers were prominently featured in all forms of popular media.” — Lawrence J. Ouellet

QuestionThe Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issues Hours of Service regulations.At the same time, they govern the working hours of anyone operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in the United States.Such regulations apply to truck drivers, commercial and city bus drivers, and school bus drivers who operate CMVs. With these rules in place, the number of daily and weekly hours spent driving and workingis limited.The FMCSA regulates theminimumamount of time drivers must spend resting between driving shifts. In regards to intrastate commerce, the respective state's regulations apply.

QuestionIn 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.