Schroeder Moving Systems

USDOT # 618644
13805 1st Ave N
Minneapolis, MN 55441
Minneapolis
Minnesota
Contact Phone: 1-800-482-6683
Additional Phone: (763) 694-6070
Company Site: www.schroedermoving.com

Moving with Schroeder Moving Systems

Schroeder Moving Systems began in 1947 and we have been helping people move ever since. From our humble beginnings as a small team of movers with a lone Chevy truck and a canvas on top, our commitment to excellence has made us into one of the biggest full service moving companies in Wisconsin.
Today, from our offices in Appleton and Milwaukee—and with over 200,000 square feet oftemperature-controlled storage in locations throughout the state—we are fully equipped to meet your unique Milwaukee or Appleton moving needs.
Our singular focus is to provide you, our customer, with whatever is necessary to complete yourmove smoothly and efficiently. We accomplish this with the best of customer service, the latest in moving technology, and a skilled team of expert packers, loaders, and van operators. All of our employees are certified professionals and dedicated to meeting your specific moving needs.



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Your Schroeder Moving Systems Reviews


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This is the second time I utilized Schroeder Moving Systems and at the end of the day they made a great showing. Much obliged to you Alex and Tony for your polished methodology for the duration of the day and your positive "can do" demeanor! I welcomed the consideration you brought with my furniture and all your diligent work. You made the move an extraordinary affair!

Did You Know

Question The public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations. However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time. The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's they were depicted as heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road. Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as they were glorified as modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's. Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

Question Trucks and cars have much in common mechanically as well as ancestrally. One link between them is the steam-powered fardier Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built it in 1769. Unfortunately for him, steam trucks were not really common until the mid 1800's. While looking at this practically, it would be much harder to have a steam truck. This is mostly due to the fact that the roads of the time were built for horse and carriages. Steam trucks were left to very short hauls, usually from a factory to the nearest railway station. In 1881, the first semi-trailer appeared, and it was in fact towed by a steam tractor manufactured by De Dion-Bouton. Steam-powered trucks were sold in France and in the United States, apparently until the eve of World War I. Also, at the beginning of World War II in the United Kingdom, they were known as 'steam wagons'.

Question All cars must pass some sort of emission check, such as a smog check to ensure safety. Similarly, trucks are subject to noise emission requirement, which is emanating from the U.S. Noise Control Act. This was intended to protect the public from noise health side effects. The loud noise is due to the way trucks contribute disproportionately to roadway noise. This is primarily due to the elevated stacks and intense tire and aerodynamic noise characteristics.

Question

Implemented in 2014, the National Registry, requires all Medical Examiners (ME) who conduct physical examinations and issue medical certifications for interstate CMV drivers to complete training on FMCSA’s physical qualification standards, must pass a certification test. This is to demonstrate competence through periodic training and testing. CMV drivers whose medical certifications expire must use MEs on the National Registry for their examinations.


FMCSA has reached its goal of at least 40,000 certified MEs signing onto the registry. All this means is that drivers or movers can now find certified medical examiners throughout the country who can perform their medical exam. FMCSA is preparing to issue a follow-on “National Registry 2” rule stating new requirements. In this case, MEs are to submit medical certificate information on a daily basis. These daily updates are sent to the FMCSA, which will then be sent to the states electronically. This process will dramatically decrease the chance of drivers falsifying medical cards.

Question

Although there are exceptions, city routes are interestingly most often found in the Midwestern area of the United States. Though they essentially serve the same purpose as business routes, they are different. They feature "CITY" signs as opposed to "BUSINESS" signs above or below route shields. Many of these city routes are becoming irrelevant for today's transportation. Due to this, they are being eliminated in favor of the business route designation.