True North Transportation

USDOT # 1603725
527 Morley Drive
Saginaw, MI 48601
Saginaw
Michigan
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (989) 755-3000
Company Site:

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Our Company as of late utilized True North Transportation for our office move. Their well disposed movers went well beyond what we expected - re-moving boxes and furniture around the workplace when it turned out our unique situation didn't bode well, ensuring everything was precisely where we needed it before they exited, and messing around with it the entire time.

We kept running into some different knocks along the way - with our telephone company, garbage haulers, and so on - yet everybody in the workplace concurred that the folks at True North Transportation were the highlight of the move. They made everything as simple as could be allowed and we never needed to stress getting anything moved over in one piece and in the opportune spot (which was particularly decent given everything else we needed to stress over).

I would prescribe them without a second thought to anybody searching for inviting and expert movers.

I simply utilized them to move me. They were wonderful ! 1 I was truly satisfied with the entire procedure. From deals the distance to the huge day. I would utilize them once more

Did You Know

QuestionPrior tothe 20th century, freight was generally transported overland via trains and railroads.During this time, trains were essential, and they werehighlyefficient at moving large amounts of freight.But, they could only deliver that freight to urban centers for distribution by horse-drawn transport.Though there were several trucks throughout this time, theywere usedmore as space for advertising that for actual utility.At this time, the use of range for trucks was quite challenging.The use of electric engines, lack of paved rural roads, and small load capacities limited trucks to most short-haul urban routes.

Question“Writer-director James Mottern said he was influenced by nuanced, beloved movies of the 1970s such as "The Last Detail" and "Five Easy Pieces." Mottern said his female trucker character began with a woman he saw at a Southern California truck stop — a "beautiful woman, bleach blonde ... skin tanned to leather walked like a Teamster, blue eyes.” - Paul Brownfield

QuestionIn the United States, the Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 established minimum requirements that must be met when a state issues a commercial driver's license CDL. It specifies the following types of license: - Class A CDL drivers. Drive vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater, or any combination of vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater when towing a trailer weighing more than 10,000 pounds. Transports quantities of hazardous materials that require warning placards under Department of Public Safety regulations. - Class A Driver License permits. Is a step in preparation for Class A drivers to become a Commercial Driver. - Class B CDL driver. Class B is designed to transport 16 or more passengers (including driver) or more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation. This includes, but is not limited to, tow trucks, tractor trailers, and buses.

QuestionThe Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a division of the USDOT specializing in highway transportation. The agency's major influential activities are generally separated into two different "programs". The first is the Federal-aid Highway Program.This provides financial aid to support the construction, maintenance, and operation of the U.S. highway network.The second program, the Federal Lands Highway Program, shares a similar name with different intentions.The purpose of this program is to improve transportation involving Federal and Tribal lands.They also focus on preserving "national treasures" for the historic and beatific enjoyment for all.


QuestionThe 1980s were full of happening things, but in 1982 a Southern California truck driver gained short-lived fame. His name was Larry Walters, also known as "Lawn Chair Larry", for pulling a crazy stunt. He ascended to a height of 16,000 feet (4,900 m) by attaching helium balloons to a lawn chair, hence the name.Walters claims he only intended to remain floating near the ground andwas shockedwhen his chair shot up at a rate of 1,000 feet (300 m) per minute.The inspiration for such a stunt Walters claims his poor eyesight for ruining his dreams to become an Air Force pilot.