Petoskey Moving Company company logo

Petoskey Moving Company

3/5

Membership(s) & License

LICENSE INFO:

US DOT #1862167

Petoskey Moving Company authority

Toll Free

not available

Phone

(231) 347-2300

Website

cjmoving.com

Our Office

1680 Clarion Ave

Petoskey Moving Company 1680 Clarion Ave

Petoskey Moving Company will issue serving to our clientel as we endeavor to fulfill our clients motives.
Petoskey Moving Company takes into retainer the sentiment and critiquing our clients may take.
Mark off out our Petoskey Moving Company by reassessment below to determine what our clients are saying about Petoskey Moving Company.

COPY AND PASTE THE CODE BELOW INTO YOUR BLOG OR WEBSITE (Click to copy)
<a href="https://www.movingauthority.com/best-movers/Michigan/Petoskey/petoskey-moving-reviews/"><img width="150" height="133" src="https://www.movingauthority.com/static/new_design/images/badge-1.webp" alt="Petoskey Moving Company" /></a>
Code copied!

People also viewed

See all >>

Customers Reviews

3.0

2 Reviews

+ Write A Review

To see full content of an review, just click on card that you want to see.

Blair S

Blair S

02/11/2016

First class in Moving. Extraordinary Price and Caring individuals the distance. They completed the occupation 1.5 hours at an early stage an each HOT day. Stunning! Call Chuck for 4 Star Service!!

Kathryn R

Kathryn R

01/29/2016

What a sham ... overexpensive, questionable and not justified, despite any potential benefits. Had two folks convey a table purchased in a shop in Petoskey - they were very moderate and assumed control 2 hours to convey to our home in HS (15 mins away)...plus, they knicked the corner (in any event it was bothered regardless!) As of late attempted to save a group for the weekend and got stonewalled (in spite of reserving a spot - obviously "keeping" that is an alternate issue). Managed an extremely inconsiderate proprietor - ....don't trouble with these jokers; call Blane's!

/

Add your comment


did you know

Did you know?

As we've learned the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 was crucial in the construction of the Interstate Highway System. Described as an interconnected network of the controlled-access freeway. It also allowed larger trucks to travel at higher speeds through rural and urban areas alike. This act was also the first to allow the first federal largest gross vehicle weight limits for trucks, set at 73,208 pounds (33,207 kg). The very same year, Malcolm McLean pioneered modern containerized intermodal shipping. This allowed for the more efficient transfer of cargo between truck, train, and ships.

In 1976, the number one hit on the Billboard chart was "Convoy," a novelty song by C.W. McCall about a convoy of truck drivers evading speed traps and toll booths across America. The song inspired the 1978 action film Convoy directed by Sam Peckinpah. After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike and participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis (although similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis).

In the United States, shipments larger than about 7,000 kg (15,432 lb) are classified as truckload freight (TL). It is more efficient and affordable for a large shipment to have exclusive use of one larger trailer. This is opposed to having to share space on a smaller Less than Truckload freight carrier.

“The association of truckers with cowboys and related myths was perhaps most obvious during the urban-cowboy craze of the late 1970s, a period that saw middle-class urbanites wearing cowboy clothing and patronizing simulated cowboy nightclubs. During this time, at least four truck driver movies appeared, CB radio became popular, and truck drivers were prominently featured in all forms of popular media.” — Lawrence J. Ouellet

In the United States, the Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 established minimum requirements that must be met when a state issues a commercial driver's license CDL. It specifies the following types of license: - Class A CDL drivers. Drive vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater, or any combination of vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater when towing a trailer weighing more than 10,000 pounds. Transports quantities of hazardous materials that require warning placards under Department of Public Safety regulations. - Class A Driver License permits. Is a step in preparation for Class A drivers to become a Commercial Driver. - Class B CDL driver. Class B is designed to transport 16 or more passengers (including driver) or more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation. This includes, but is not limited to, tow trucks, tractor trailers, and buses.

The FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book. This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred. In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). This automatically records the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

The main purpose of the HOS regulation is to prevent accidents due to driver fatigue. To do this, the number of driving hours per day, as well as the number of driving hours per week, have been limited. Another measure to prevent fatigue is to keep drivers on a 21 to 24-hour schedule in order to maintain a natural sleep/wake cycle. Drivers must take a daily minimum period of rest and are allowed longer "weekend" rest periods. This is in hopes to combat cumulative fatigue effects that accrue on a weekly basis.