BEST MOVING COMPANIES IN WORCESTER.MA

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Worcester has a total area 38.6 square miles (100 km 2 ). 37.6 square miles (97 km 2 ) of it is land and 1.0 square mile (2.6 km 2 ) (roughly 2.59%) is water. Worcester is bordered by the towns of Auburn , Grafton , Holden , Leicester , Millbury , Paxton , Shrewsbury , and West Boylston .
Worcester is known as the Heart of the Commonwealth, because of its proximity to the center of Massachusetts. The city is about 45 miles (72 km) west of Boston , 40 miles (64 km) east of Springfield , and 38 miles (61 km) northwest of Providence, Rhode Island .
The Blackstone River forms in the center of Worcester by the confluence of the Middle River and Mill Brook. The river courses underground through the center of the city, and emerges at the foot of College Hill. It then flows south through Quinsigamond Village and into Millbury. Worcester is the beginning of the Blackstone Valley that frames the river. The Blackstone Canal was once an important waterway connecting Worcester to Providence and the Eastern Seaboard , but the canal fell into disuse at the end of the 19th century and was mostly covered up. In recent years, local organizations including the Canal District Business Association have proposed restoring the canal and creating a Blackstone Valley National Park .
Worcester is one of many cities claimed, like Rome , to be found on seven hills: Airport Hill, Bancroft Hill, Belmont Hill (Bell Hill), Grafton Hill , Green Hill, Pakachoag Hill and Vernon Hill. However, Worcester has more than seven hills including Indian Hill, Newton Hill, Poet's Hill, and Wigwam Hill.
Worcester has many ponds and two prominent lakes: Indian Lake and Lake Quinsigamond . Lake Quinsigamond (also known as Long Pond ) stretches four miles across the Worcester and Shrewsbury border and is a very popular competitive rowing and boating destination.
Did You Know

Question

The trucking industry has made a large historical impact since the early 20th century. It has affected the U.S. bothpoliticallyas well aseconomicallysince the notion has begun.Previous to the invention of automobiles, most freightwas moved bytrain or horse-drawn carriage. Trucks were firstexclusivelyused by the military during World War I.
After the war, construction of paved roads increased. As a result, trucking began to achieve significant popularity by the 1930's.Soon after trucking became subject to various government regulation, such as the hours of service.During the later 1950's and 1960's, trucking accelerated due to the construction of the Interstate Highway System.The Interstate Highway System is an extensive network of freeways linking major cities cross country.

QuestionBusiness routes always have the same number as the routes they parallel. For example, U.S. 1 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, U.S. Route 1, and Interstate 40 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, Interstate 40.

Question

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period.At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.
The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty tobe usedfor meals and rest breaks.This meant that the weekly maxwas limitedto 60 hours over 7 days (non-dailydrivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

QuestionThe decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed todramaticallyincrease popularity among trucker culture.Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck driversare romanticizedas modern-day cowboys and outlaws.These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Informationregardingthe locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.

QuestionUnfortunately for the trucking industry, their image began to crumble during the latter part of the 20th century. As a result, their reputation suffered. More recently truckers havebeen portrayedas chauvinists or even worse, serial killers.The portrayals of semi-trailer trucks have focused on stories of the trucks becoming self-aware. Generally, this is with some extraterrestrial help.

QuestionSome trailers canbe towed byan accessible pickup truck or van, which generally need no special permit beyond a regular license. Such examples wouldbe enclosedtoy trailers and motorcycle trailers. Specialized trailers like an open-air motorcycle trailer and bicycle trailers are accessible.Some trailers are much more accessible to small automobiles, as are some simple trailers pulled by a drawbar and riding on a single set of axles.Other trailers also have a variety, such as a utility trailer, travel trailers or campers, etc. to allow for varying sizes of tow vehicles.