ABC Van Lines

USDOT # 297081
229 Newbury
Peabody, MA 01960
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (978) 535-0233
Company Site:

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Moved from Massachusetts to California. This was the primary involvement with a noteworthy moving moving company as the greater part of my moves have been nearby.

A Mr. Reddington went to our home and clarified everything from the pressing of our assets, to how moving day would come to pass on both closures. His insight and polished methodology emerged over the greater part of alternate evaluations we got from different companys. The general expenses were right on the money. He conveyed what he said he would.

The movers were exceptionally wonderful and diligent employees. The courses of action for the get and conveyance of our furniture were inside of the dates that were consented to.

Generally speaking this transformed into a smooth move from one coast to the next.

They pressed, moved, and conveyed our TV. When we opened their meager bundling, the screen was split and it's not working. Despite everything we have not heard once more from them.

Did You Know

QuestionThe United States' Interstate Highway System is full of bypasses and loops with the designation of a three-digit number.Usually beginning with an even digit, it is important to note that this pattern ishighlyinconsistent. For example, in Des Moines, Iowa the genuine bypass is the main route.Morespecifically, it is Interstate 35 and Interstate 80, with the loop into downtown Des Moines being Interstate 235. As itis illustratedin this example, they do not alwaysconsistentlybegin with an even number.However, the 'correct' designationis exemplifiedin Omaha, Nebraska.In Omaha, Interstate 480 traverses the downtown area, whichis bypassed byInterstate 80, Interstate 680, and Interstate 95. Interstate 95 then in turn goes through Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Furthermore, Interstate 295 is the bypass around Philadelphia, which leads into New Jersey.Although this can all be rather confusing, it is most important to understand the Interstate Highway System and the role bypasses play.


Implemented in 2014, the National Registry, requires all Medical Examiners (ME) who conduct physical examinations and issue medical certifications for interstate CMV drivers to complete training on FMCSA’s physical qualification standards, must pass a certification test. This is to demonstrate competence through periodic training and testing. CMV drivers whose medical certifications expire must use MEs on the National Registry for their examinations.

FMCSA has reached its goal of at least 40,000 certified MEs signing onto the registry. All this means is that drivers or movers can now find certified medical examiners throughout the country who can perform their medical exam. FMCSA is preparing to issue a follow-on “National Registry 2” rule stating new requirements. In this case, MEs are to submit medical certificate information on a daily basis. These daily updates are sent to the FMCSA, which will then be sent to the states electronically. This process will dramatically decrease the chance of drivers falsifying medical cards.

QuestionThe American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO)was organizedand founded on December 12, 1914.On November 13, 1973, the namewas alteredto the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials.This slight change in name reflects a broadened scope of attention towards all modes of transportation.Despite the implications of the name change, most of the activities itis involvedin still gravitate towards highways.

QuestionIn 1984 the animated TV series The Transformers told the story of a group of extraterrestrial humanoid robots.However, itjustso happens that they disguise themselves as automobiles. Their leader of the Autobots clan, Optimus Prime,is depictedas an awesome semi-truck.

QuestionCommercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you.Justto name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes.They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways.They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.