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New Bedford is located at 41°39′06″N 70°56′01″W / 41.651803°N 70.933705°W / 41.651803; -70.933705 (41.651803, -70.933705). According to the United States Census Bureau , the city has a total area of 24.1 square miles (62.5 km 2 ). Of the total area, 20.0 square miles (51.8 km 2 ) is land, and 4.1 square miles (10.7 km 2 ), or 17.13%, is water. New Bedford is a coastal city, a seaport, bordered on the west by Dartmouth , on the north by Freetown , on the east by Acushnet and Fairhaven , and on the south by Buzzards Bay . From New Bedford's northern border with Freetown to the Buzzards Bay coast at Clark's Point the distance is approximately 14 miles (23 km). Across New Bedford east to west is a distance of about 2 miles (3.2 km). The highest point in the city is an unnamed hill crossed by Interstate 195 and Hathaway Road west of downtown, with an elevation greater than 180 feet (55 m) above sea level.
New Bedford Harbor, a body of water shared with Fairhaven, is actually the estuary of the Acushnet River where it empties into Buzzards Bay . The river empties into the bay beyond Clark's Point, the southernmost point of the city. To the west of Clark's Point is Clark's Cove, which extends landward approximately one and a half mile from the bay. Just south of Palmer's Island, beginning near Fort Phoenix in Fairhaven, lies a two-mile-long hurricane barrier, constructed in the 1960s to protect the inner harbor where the fishing fleet anchors. Along with Palmer's Island, the city also lays claim to Fish Island and Pope's Island . Between these two islands lies one of the three sections, the central section, of the New Bedford-Fairhaven Bridge. The central span, a swing bridge, connects the two islands as well as allowing boats and ships passage to the upper harbor. Two conventional bridges connect each of the islands to the nearest mainland, Fish Island to New Bedford and Pope's Island to Fairhaven. In addition to the harbor, there are several small brooks and ponds within the city limits.
There are several parks and playgrounds located throughout the city, the largest being Brooklawn Park in the north end, Fort Taber Park (also referred to as Fort Rodman, the name of another fort built there) at Clark's Point, and Buttonwood Park, directly west of the downtown area near the Dartmouth town line. Buttonwood Park is also the site of a lagoon which feeds into Buttonwood Brook, and the Buttonwood Zoo. In the northwest part of the town, extending into Dartmouth, lies the Acushnet Cedar Swamp State Reservation.
Did You Know


The trucking industry has made a large historical impact since the early 20th century. It has affected the U.S. bothpoliticallyas well aseconomicallysince the notion has begun.Previous to the invention of automobiles, most freightwas moved bytrain or horse-drawn carriage. Trucks were firstexclusivelyused by the military during World War I.
After the war, construction of paved roads increased. As a result, trucking began to achieve significant popularity by the 1930's.Soon after trucking became subject to various government regulation, such as the hours of service.During the later 1950's and 1960's, trucking accelerated due to the construction of the Interstate Highway System.The Interstate Highway System is an extensive network of freeways linking major cities cross country.

QuestionThe United States Department of Transportation has become a fundamental necessity in the moving industry.It is the pinnacle of the industry, creating and enforcing regulations for the sake of safety for both businesses and consumers alike.However, it is notable to appreciate the history of such a powerful department.The functions currently performed by the DOT were once enforced by the Secretary of Commerce for Transportation.In 1965, Najeeb Halaby, administrator of the Federal Aviation Adminstration (FAA), had an excellent suggestion.He spoke to the current President Lyndon B. Johnson, advising that transportationbe elevatedto a cabinet level position. He continued, suggesting that the FAAbe foldedor merged, if you will, into the DOT.Clearly, the President took to Halaby's fresh ideasregardingtransportation, thus putting the DOT into place.

QuestionThe FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book.This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred.In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). Thisautomaticallyrecords the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

QuestionIn 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.

QuestionThe term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry.This is where the wordis knownto havebeen usedin 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage)specificallya large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin.It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911.Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry"was usedfor a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.

QuestionIn the United States and Canada, the cost for long-distance moves is generally determined by a few factors. The first is the weight of the items tobe movedand the distance it will go. Cost is also based on howquicklythe items are tobe moved, as well as the time of the year or month which the move occurs. In the United Kingdom and Australia, it's quite different. They base price on the volume of the items as opposed to their weight. Keep in mind some movers may offer flat rate pricing.