Unified Van Lines

USDOT # 2956586
110.1 Wilso Drive
Baltimore, MD 21223
Baltimore
Maryland
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Additional Phone: (844) 600-2784
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I was thrilled with this move and moving or furniture within the house. I was also able to donate an organ that I had been told could not be donated, but your crew recommending we take it to Good Will. They were fast, kind, and thorough. I will definitely use them again when we sell the house. God bless all of you!

I had a great day of move with Unified Moving. I knew these guys were well but they just exceeded our expectation. The strong guys arrived on time and worked like that is nothing to them. We had so many furniture and delicate antiques.

They were very polite and courteous , would highly recommend this moving company. Their reputation exceeds them. Would refer to anyone looking to move with a company you can trust to do the job.

The movers were so hard working. They said they might go over on time because there was a little difficulty moving my couch but they finished up right on the quote time!

Did You Know

Question

Very light trucks.Popular in Europe and Asia, many mini-trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles, usually with monocoque bodies.Specialized designs withsubstantialframes such as the Italian Piaggio shown hereare basedupon Japanese designs (in this case by Daihatsu) and are popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities that often have very narrow alleyways. Regardless of the name, these small trucks serve a wide range of uses.In Japan, theyare regulatedunder the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break on taxes for buying a smaller and less-powerful vehicle (currently, the engineis limitedto 660 ccs {0.66L} displacement). These vehiclesare usedas on-road utility vehicles in Japan.These Japanese-made mini trucks thatwere manufacturedfor on-road use are competing with off-road ATVs in the United States, and import regulationsrequirethat these mini trucks have a 25 mph (40 km/h) speed governor as theyare classifiedas low-speed vehicles.These vehicles have found uses in construction, large campuses (government, university, and industrial), agriculture, cattle ranches, amusement parks, and replacements for golf carts.Major mini truck manufacturers and their brands: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishi Minicab, Subaru Sambar, Suzuki Carry
As with many things in Europe and Asia, the illusion of delicacy and proper manners always seems to attract tourists.Popular in Europe and Asia, mini trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles with monochrome bodies.Such specialized designs with such great frames such as the Italian Piaggio, based upon Japanese designs. In this case itwas basedupon Japanese designs made by Daihatsu.These are very popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities, which often have very narrow alleyways.Despite whatever name theyare called, these very light trucks serve a wide variety of purposes.
Yet, in Japan theyare regulatedunder the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break in taxes for buying a small and less-powerful vehicle. Currently, the engineis limitedto 660 cc [0.66L] displacement. These vehicles beganbeing usedas on-road utility vehicles in Japan.Classified as a low speed vehicle, these Japanese-made mini truckswere manufacturedfor on-road use for competing the the off-road ATVs in the United States. Import regulationsrequirethat the mini trucks have a 25 mph (40km/h) speed governor. Again, this is because they are low speed vehicles.
However, these vehicles have foundnumerousamounts of ways to help the community.They invest money into the government, universities, amusement parks, and replacements for golf cars.They have some major Japanese mini truck manufacturarers as well as brands such as: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishit Minicab, Subaru Sambar, and Suzuki Carry.

QuestionA business route (occasionally city route) in the United States and Canada is a short special route connected to a parent numbered highway at its beginning, then routed through the central business district of a nearby city or town, and finally reconnecting with the same parent numbered highway again at its end.

QuestionThe Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways is most commonly known as the Interstate Highway System, Interstate Freeway System, Interstate System, or simply the Interstate. It is a network of controlled-access highways that forms a part of the National Highway System of the United States. Named after President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who endorsed its formation, the idea was to have portable moving and storage. Construction was authorized by the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. The original portion was completed 35 years later, although some urban routes were canceled and never built. The network has since been extended and, as of 2013, it had a total length of 47,856 miles (77,017 km), making it the world's second longest after China's. As of 2013, about one-quarter of all vehicle miles driven in the country use the Interstate system. In 2006, the cost of construction had been estimated at about $425 billion (equivalent to $511 billion in 2015).

QuestionBusiness routes generally follow the original routing of the numbered route through a city or town.Beginning in the 1930s and lasting thru the 1970s was an era marking a peak in large-scale highway construction in the United States. U.S. Highways and Interstates weretypicallybuilt in particular phases.Their first phase of development began with the numbered route carrying traffic through the center of a city or town.The second phase involved the construction of bypasses around the central business districts of the towns they began.As bypass construction continued, original parts of routes that had once passed straight thru a city would often become a "business route".

Question

The year of 1977 marked the release of the infamous Smokey and the Bandit.It went on to be the third highest grossing film that year, following tough competitors like Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind.Burt Reynolds plays the protagonist, or "The Bandit", who escorts "The Snowman"in order todeliver bootleg beer.Reynolds once stated he envisioned trucking as a "hedonistic joyrideentirelydevoid from economic reality"
Another action film in 1977 also focused on truck drivers, as was the trend it seems. Breaker! Breaker! starring infamous Chuck Norris also focused on truck drivers. They were also displaying movie posters with the catch phrase "... he's got a CB radio and a hundred friends whojustmight get mad!"