Parker K Bailey & Sons

USDOT # 57108
6 State St
Brewer, ME 04412
Brewer
Maine
Contact Phone: 1-800-370-6161
Additional Phone: (207) 989-6161
Company Site: www.parkerkbailey.com

Moving with Parker K Bailey & Sons

Parker K Bailey & Sons will provide to our clientel as we endeavor to encounter our customers original plans.
Each customer has dissimilar essential for their move, which is why Parker K Bailey & Sons provides service and removal company to suffice our full to accommodate them.
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They conveyed my furniture not surprisingly with no scratches.These folks have part of tolerance and aided in amassing it.

They took consideration to wrap everything- - TV, bedding, and so on and didn't whine about anything. They made jokes and made me feel truly great.

Did You Know

QuestionTrucks of the era mostly used two-cylinder engines and had a carrying capacity of 1,500 to 2,000 kilograms (3,300 to 4,400 lb). In 1904, 700 heavy trucks were built in the United States, 1000 in 1907, 6000 in 1910, and 25000 in 1914. A Benz truck modified by Netphener company (1895)

Question

In the United States, commercial truck classificationis fixed byeach vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8.Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty.The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks.Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS,formerlyknown as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

QuestionThe FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book.This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred.In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). Thisautomaticallyrecords the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

Question

The Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula is a mathematical formula used in the United States to determine the appropriate gross weight for a long distance moving vehicle, based on the axle number and spacing. Enforced bythe Department of Transportation upon long-haul truck drivers, it is used as a means of preventing heavy vehicles from damaging roads and bridges.This is especially in particular to the total weight of a loaded truck, whetherbeing usedfor commercial moving services or for long distance moving services in general.
 
According to the Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula, the total weight of a loaded truck (tractor and trailer, 5-axle rig) cannot exceed 80,000 lbs in the United States.Under ordinary circumstances, long-haul equipment trucks will weight about 15,000 kg (33,069 lbs). This leaves about 20,000 kg (44,092 lbs) of freight capacity.Likewise, a loadis limitedto the space available in the trailer,normallywith dimensions of 48 ft (14.63 m) or 53 ft (16.15 m) long, 2.6 m (102.4 in) wide, 2.7 m (8 ft 10.3 in) high and 13 ft 6 in or 4.11 m high.

QuestionWords have always had a different meaning or havebeen usedinterchangeablywith others across all cultures.In the United States, Canada, and the Philippines the word "truck" ismostlyreserved for larger vehicles.Although in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, the word "truck" is generally reserved for large vehicles. In Australia and New Zealand, a pickup truck is usually called a ute, short for "utility". While over in South Africa it is called a bakkie (Afrikaans: "small open container").The United Kingdom, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Ireland, and Hong Kong use the "lorry" instead of truck, but only for medium and heavy types.