Lexington Transport

USDOT # 1455112
PUC # 3616
667 N Homestead LN
Lancaster, KY 40444
Lancaster
Kentucky
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (859) 548-4242
Company Site: www.lexingtontransport.com

Moving with Lexington Transport

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Folks are incredible and quick. Not too bad up til now. They ensured everything was wrapped up conveniently.

Did You Know

QuestionTrucks of the era mostly used two-cylinder engines and had a carrying capacity of 1,500 to 2,000 kilograms (3,300 to 4,400 lb). In 1904, 700 heavy trucks were built in the United States, 1000 in 1907, 6000 in 1910, and 25000 in 1914. A Benz truck modified by Netphener company (1895)

QuestionThe Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is an agency within the United States Department of Transportation.The purpose of the FMCSA is to regulate safety within the trucking and moving industry in the United States.The FMCSA enforces safety precautions that reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities involving large trucks and buses.

QuestionThe word cargo is in reference to particular goods that are generally used for commercial gain. Cargo transportation is generally meant to mean by ship, boat, or plane.However, the term now applies to all types of freight, now including goods carried by train, van, or truck.This term is now used in the case of goods in the cold-chain, as perishable inventory is always cargo in transport towards its final home.Even when itis heldin climate-controlled facilities, it is important to remember perishable goods or inventory have a short life.

Question1941 was a tough era to live through.Yet, President Roosevelt appointed a special committee to explore the idea of a "national inter-regional highway" system. Unfortunately, the committee's progress came to a halt with the rise of the World War II.After the war was over, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1944 authorized the designation of what are not termed 'Interstate Highways'.However, he did not include any funding program to build such highways.With limited resources came limited progress until President Dwight D. Eisenhower came along in 1954. He renewed interest in the 1954 plan. Although, this began and long and bitter debate between various interests.Generally, the opposing sides were considering where such funding would come from such as rail, truck, tire, oil, and farm groups. All who would overpay for the new highways and how.