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Dayton is located in the northernmost part of Campbell County at 39°6′42″N 84°28′13″W  /  39.11167°N 84.47028°W  / 39.11167; -84.47028 (39.111781, −84.470401), on the inside of a bend in the Ohio River. It is the most northernmost community in Kentucky as well. Dayton is bordered by Bellevue to the southwest and Fort Thomas to the southeast. To the north, across the Ohio River, is Cincinnati in Hamilton County, Ohio . The closest bridge across the Ohio is the Daniel Carter Beard Bridge on Interstate 471 , connecting Newport with Cincinnati.
According to the United States Census Bureau , Dayton has a total area of 1.9 square miles (5.0 km 2 ), of which 1.3 square miles (3.3 km 2 ) is land and 0.66 square miles (1.7 km 2 ), or 33.61%, is water. Dayton is located within Kentucky's Outer Bluegrass region in the Upper South .
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QuestionA moving company, removalist, or van line are all companies that help people as well as other businesses to move their good from one place to another.With many inclusive services for relocation like packing, loading, moving, unloading, unpacking and arranging of items can allbe takencare of for you. Some services may include cleaning the place and have warehousing facilities.

QuestionMany modern trucksare powered bydiesel engines, although small to medium size trucks with gas engines exist in the United States.The European Union rules that vehicles with a gross combination of mass up to 3,500 kg (7,716 lb) are also known as light commercial vehicles. Any vehicles exceeding that weightare knownas large goods vehicles.


Very light trucks.Popular in Europe and Asia, many mini-trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles, usually with monocoque bodies.Specialized designs withsubstantialframes such as the Italian Piaggio shown hereare basedupon Japanese designs (in this case by Daihatsu) and are popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities that often have very narrow alleyways. Regardless of the name, these small trucks serve a wide range of uses.In Japan, theyare regulatedunder the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break on taxes for buying a smaller and less-powerful vehicle (currently, the engineis limitedto 660 ccs {0.66L} displacement). These vehiclesare usedas on-road utility vehicles in Japan.These Japanese-made mini trucks thatwere manufacturedfor on-road use are competing with off-road ATVs in the United States, and import regulationsrequirethat these mini trucks have a 25 mph (40 km/h) speed governor as theyare classifiedas low-speed vehicles.These vehicles have found uses in construction, large campuses (government, university, and industrial), agriculture, cattle ranches, amusement parks, and replacements for golf carts.Major mini truck manufacturers and their brands: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishi Minicab, Subaru Sambar, Suzuki Carry
As with many things in Europe and Asia, the illusion of delicacy and proper manners always seems to attract tourists.Popular in Europe and Asia, mini trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles with monochrome bodies.Such specialized designs with such great frames such as the Italian Piaggio, based upon Japanese designs. In this case itwas basedupon Japanese designs made by Daihatsu.These are very popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities, which often have very narrow alleyways.Despite whatever name theyare called, these very light trucks serve a wide variety of purposes.
Yet, in Japan theyare regulatedunder the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break in taxes for buying a small and less-powerful vehicle. Currently, the engineis limitedto 660 cc [0.66L] displacement. These vehicles beganbeing usedas on-road utility vehicles in Japan.Classified as a low speed vehicle, these Japanese-made mini truckswere manufacturedfor on-road use for competing the the off-road ATVs in the United States. Import regulationsrequirethat the mini trucks have a 25 mph (40km/h) speed governor. Again, this is because they are low speed vehicles.
However, these vehicles have foundnumerousamounts of ways to help the community.They invest money into the government, universities, amusement parks, and replacements for golf cars.They have some major Japanese mini truck manufacturarers as well as brands such as: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishit Minicab, Subaru Sambar, and Suzuki Carry.


In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period.At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.
The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty tobe usedfor meals and rest breaks.This meant that the weekly maxwas limitedto 60 hours over 7 days (non-dailydrivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.


The year of 1977 marked the release of the infamous Smokey and the Bandit.It went on to be the third highest grossing film that year, following tough competitors like Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind.Burt Reynolds plays the protagonist, or "The Bandit", who escorts "The Snowman"in order todeliver bootleg beer.Reynolds once stated he envisioned trucking as a "hedonistic joyrideentirelydevoid from economic reality"
Another action film in 1977 also focused on truck drivers, as was the trend it seems. Breaker! Breaker! starring infamous Chuck Norris also focused on truck drivers. They were also displaying movie posters with the catch phrase "... he's got a CB radio and a hundred friends whojustmight get mad!"

Question1941 was a tough era to live through.Yet, President Roosevelt appointed a special committee to explore the idea of a "national inter-regional highway" system. Unfortunately, the committee's progress came to a halt with the rise of the World War II.After the war was over, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1944 authorized the designation of what are not termed 'Interstate Highways'.However, he did not include any funding program to build such highways.With limited resources came limited progress until President Dwight D. Eisenhower came along in 1954. He renewed interest in the 1954 plan. Although, this began and long and bitter debate between various interests.Generally, the opposing sides were considering where such funding would come from such as rail, truck, tire, oil, and farm groups. All who would overpay for the new highways and how.