Meme's Moving In

USDOT # 2916155
5320 Park Emerson Dr
Indianapolis, IN 46203
Indianapolis
Indiana
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (501) 291-6614
Company Site:

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Did You Know

QuestionAs of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA)was establishedas its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999".The FMCSAis basedin Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia.Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

QuestionThere are various versions of a moving scam, but itbasicallybegins with a prospective client. Then the client starts to contact a moving company to request a cost estimate. In today's market, unfortunately, this often happens online or via phone calls. Soessentiallya customer is contacting them for a quote when the moving company may not have a license. These moving sales people are salesman prone to quoting sometimes low.Even though usually reasonable prices with no room for the movers to provide a quality service if it is a broker.

QuestionLight trucksare classifiedthis way because they are car-sized, yet in the U.S. they can be no more than 6,300 kg (13,900 lb). Theseare used bynot only used by individuals but also businesses as well. In the UK they may not weigh more than 3,500 kg (7,700 lb) andare authorizedto drive with a driving license for cars.Pickup trucks, popular in North America, are most seen in North America and some regions of Latin America, Asia, and Africa.Although Europe doesn't seem to follow this trend, where the size of the commercial vehicle is most often made as vans.

QuestionIn today's society, there are rules and regulations everywhere you go, the same goes for commercial vehicles. The federal government has strict regulations that mustbe met, such as how many hours a driver may be on the clock. For example, 11 hours driving /14 hours on-duty followed by 10 hours off, with a max of 70 hours/8 days or 60 hours/7 days.They can also set rules deciding how much rest and sleep timeis required,however, these are only a couple of regulations set. Any violations are often subject to harsh penalties.In some cases, there are instruments to track each driver's hours, which are becoming more necessary.

QuestionCommercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you.Justto name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes.They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways.They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.