Allied Van Lines Moving Company

USDOT # 76235
5001 US HWY 30 W
Fort Wayne, IN
Fort Wayne
Contact Phone: 1‑800‑444‑6787
Additional Phone: 260) 429-2511
Company Site:

Moving with Allied Van Lines Moving Company

Allied Van Lines is an American moving company founded in 1928 as a cooperative non-profit organization owned by its member agents on the east coast of the United States, to help with organizing return loads and minimizing dead-heading (i.e. operating trucks without shipments loaded on them). In 1968 it was reorganzied as a standard public company, with shares. In 1999 it merged with its larger competitor, North American Van Lines, and the combined entity then came under the holding company Allied Worldwide. In 2002, Allied Worldwide was renamed SIRVA.

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From beginning to end exceptionally expert, pleasant and snappy. The workplace individuals were awesome. The packers quick and intensive. The movers were pleasant, quick and watchful.

Stunning movers!!! I have had hand surgery in the past and for the most part need movers to help at whatever time I move, and I need to say this moving company is absolutely expert and awesome. We needed to move in January amid the center of a snow storms, and our movers were great - moving rapidly, precisely, and tenaciously. When we got to Atlanta the folks moved everything into spot. What's more, to improve matters even we had a rebel auto park before our home and the movers still strolled and moved the additional separation without over charging us. Will absolutely utilize them once more!

Did You Know

QuestionThe American Trucking Associations initiated in 1985 with the intent to improve the industry's image. With public opinion declining the association triednumerousmoves.One such move was changing the name of the "National Truck Rodeo" to the "National Driving Championship". This was due to the fact that the word rodeo seemed to imply recklessness and reckless driving.

QuestionAs we know in the trucking industry, some trailers are part of large trucks, which we call semi-trailer trucks for transportation of cargo.Trailers may alsobe usedin a personal manner as well, whether for personal or small business purposes.

QuestionWithout strong land use controls, buildings are too often built in town right along a bypass.This results with the conversion of it into an ordinary town road, resulting in the bypass becoming as congested as the local streets.On the contrary, a bypassis intendedto avoid such local street congestion.Gas stations, shopping centers, along with various other businesses are often built alongside them.Theyare builtin hopes of easing accessibility, while home areideallyavoided for noise reasons.


The Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula is a mathematical formula used in the United Statesto determine the appropriate gross weight for a long distance moving vehicle, based on the axle number and spacing. Enforced bythe Department of Transportation upon long-haul truck drivers, it is used as a means of preventing heavy vehicles from damaging roads and bridges.This is especially in particular to the total weight of a loaded truck, whetherbeing usedfor commercial moving services or for long distance moving services in general.
According to the Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula, the total weight of a loaded truck (tractor and trailer, 5-axle rig) cannot exceed 80,000 lbs in the United States.Under ordinary circumstances, long-haul equipment trucks will weight about 15,000 kg (33,069 lbs). This leaves about 20,000 kg (44,092 lbs) of freight capacity.Likewise, a loadis limitedto the space available in the trailer,normallywith dimensions of 48 ft (14.63 m) or 53 ft (16.15 m) long, 2.6 m (102.4 in) wide, 2.7 m (8 ft 10.3 in) high and 13 ft 6 in or 4.11 m high.

QuestionHeavy trucks. A cement mixer is an example of Class 8 heavy trucks. Heavy trucks are the largest on-road trucks, Class 8. These include vocational applications such as heavy dump trucks, concrete pump trucks, and refuse hauling, as well as ubiquitous long-haul 6×4 and 4x2 tractor units. Road damage and wear increase very rapidly with the axle weight. The axle weight is the truck weight divided by the number of axles, but the actual axle weight depends on the position of the load over the axles. The number of steering axles and the suspension type also influence the amount of the road wear. In many countries with good roads, a six-axle truck may have a maximum weight over 50 tons (49 long tons; 55 short tons).