Westfield Movers Top Rated

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15 Movers in Westfield

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LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 80.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Beau

“The crew was quick, efficient, and careful. Mad...”

“The crew was quick, efficient, and careful. Made our move very easy. Thank you!”

United States Illinois Westfield

LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Alex L.

“By and by, I will be prescribing them to loved ...”

“By and by, I will be prescribing them to loved ones. Regardless they made an awesome showing.”

United States Illinois Westfield

LAST REVIEW

3 Reviewed 3 times, 60.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Cynthis Hopkins

“The moving men were rude, unprofessional, destr...”

“The moving men were rude, unprofessional, destroyed my furniture and damaged the house they were moving me into even ...”

United States Illinois Westfield

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Khalil Y.

“Super reasonable, super brisk, they truly know ...”

“Super reasonable, super brisk, they truly know how to hustle. Exceptionally suggested!”

United States Illinois Westfield

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Shaira P.

“Exceptionally suggested, and more moderate than...”

“Exceptionally suggested, and more moderate than numerous company.”

United States Illinois Westfield

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Sally M.

“Government Johnson Movers takes all the anxiety...”

“Government Johnson Movers takes all the anxiety that accompany moving and transform it into a wonderful, torment free...”

United States Illinois Westfield

LAST REVIEW

2 Reviewed 2 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Sonya C.

“This moving knowledge was a breeze in light of ...”

“This moving knowledge was a breeze in light of these folks! They are moderate and in particular think about your stuf...”

United States Illinois Westfield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 1 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Eva T.

“The movers likewise appeared on time and went w...”

“The movers likewise appeared on time and went well beyond to offer assistance. They took a great deal of pride in the...”

United States Illinois Westfield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 1 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Justine

“What a crazy hot day I hate this summer is when...”

“What a crazy hot day I hate this summer is when you have to move. Chicago is in the easiest place to move in the summ...”

United States Illinois Westfield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 1 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Kay H.

“Clifton Moving and Storage out of Decatur IL as...”

“Clifton Moving and Storage out of Decatur IL as of late moved us from Springfield IL to Santa Fe NM. I can't say enou...”

United States Illinois Westfield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 1 times, 100.0% customer satisfaction.
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 - Sanny L.

“These folks made a phenomenal showing moving me...”

“These folks made a phenomenal showing moving me at the beginning of today. They appeared (with consent) and hour earl...”

United States Illinois Westfield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 0 times, 0.0% customer satisfaction.

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United States Illinois Westfield

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1 Reviewed 0 times, 0.0% customer satisfaction.

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United States Illinois Westfield

LAST REVIEW

1 Reviewed 0 times, 0.0% customer satisfaction.

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United States Illinois Westfield

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United States Illinois Westfield

Simplify the search your relocation company. To do this, we recommend you to learn Moving Authority's reviews of services. By reading the Westfield, Illinois reviews of a mover, you are able to use them to your advantage. We consider these reviews vital sources of information, although at times they may be too private.

So you've done your research correctly? Today, it's time to make a budgeted program before you start packing and moving. Through Moving Authority you can obtain an nearby Westfield, Illinois service that 's low-cost for you and tailored to your specific type of relocation. Moving Authority has extensive listings of the safe movers so you can browse Westfield, Illinois services, whether you 're moving locally or cross country. It is important to obtain a free moving estimate with Moving Authority, this way you can make any necessary adjustments to your budgeted guideline and you will have a clear understanding of the cost for your Westfield, Illinois move.

Digressing from the moving approximation, you can as well make a loose moving price estimate right field on our web page, which is basically a more precise thought of your moving costs. This resource is rather beneficial, specially for those with a tight budget. If you 're resourceful, record the reassessment, come your research, and be after your budget accordingly; you will rest organized throughout the seemingly hectic mental process of relocating. Check into Moving Authority sureness to clear finding your Westfield, Illinois moving company a easy project.

Westfield is located at 39°27′20″N 87°59′49″W  /  39.45556°N 87.99694°W  / 39.45556; -87.99694 (39.455583, -87.996935).
According to the 2010 census, Westfield has a total area of 1 square mile (2.59 km 2 ), all land.

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AMSA wanted to help consumers avoid untrustworthy or illegitimate movers. In January 2008, AMSA created the ProMover certification program for its members. As a member, you must have federal interstate operating authority. Members are also required to pass an annual criminal back check, be licensed by the FMCSA, and agree to abide by ethical standards. This would include honesty in advertising and in business transaction with customers. Each must also sign a contract committing to adhere to applicable Surface Transportation Board and FMCSA regulations. AMSA also takes into consideration and examines ownership. They are very strict, registration with state corporation commissions. This means that the mover must maintain at least a satisfactory rating with the Better Business Bureau (BBB). As one can imagine, those that pass are authorized to display the ProMove logo on the websites and in marketing materials. However, those that fail will be expelled from the program (and AMSA) if they cannot correct discrepancies during probation.

The public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations. However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time. The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's they were depicted as heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road. Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as they were glorified as modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's. Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 40 million United States citizens have moved annually over the last decade. Of those people who have moved in the United States, 84.5% of them have moved within their own state, 12.5% have moved to another state, and 2.3% have moved to another country.

During the latter part of the 20th century, we saw a decline of the trucking culture. Coinciding with this decline was a decline of the image of truck drivers, as they became negatively stigmatized. As a result of such negativity, it makes sense that truck drivers were frequently portrayed as the "bad guy(s)" in movies.

The moving industry in the United States was deregulated with the Household Goods Transportation Act of 1980. This act allowed interstate movers to issue binding or fixed estimates for the first time. Doing so opened the door to hundreds of new moving companies to enter the industry. This led to an increase in competition and soon movers were no longer competing on services but on price. As competition drove prices lower and decreased what were already slim profit margins, "rogue" movers began hijacking personal property as part of a new scam. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) enforces Federal consumer protection regulations related to the interstate shipment of household goods (i.e., household moves that cross State lines). FMCSA has held this responsibility since 1999, and the Department of Transportation has held this responsibility since 1995 (the Interstate Commerce Commission held this authority prior to its termination in 1995).

The interstate moving industry in the United States maintains regulation by the FMCSA, which is part of the USDOT. With only a small staff (fewer than 20 people) available to patrol hundreds of moving companies, enforcement is difficult. As a result of such a small staff, there are in many cases, no regulations that qualify moving companies as 'reliable'. Without this guarantee, it is difficult to a consumer to make a choice. Although, moving companies can provide and often display a DOT license.

A semi-trailer is almost exactly what it sounds like, it is a trailer without a front axle. Proportionally, its weight is supported by two factors. The weight falls upon a road tractor or by a detachable front axle assembly, known as a dolly. Generally, a semi-trailer is equipped with legs, known in the industry as "landing gear". This means it can be lowered to support it when it is uncoupled. In the United States, a trailer may not exceed a length of 57 ft (17.37 m) on interstate highways. However, it is possible to link two smaller trailers together to reach a length of 63 ft (19.20 m).

AMSA wanted to help consumers avoid untrustworthy or illegitimate movers. In January 2008, AMSA created the ProMover certification program for its members. As a member, you must have federal interstate operating authority. Members are also required to pass an annual criminal back check, be licensed by the FMCSA, and agree to abide by ethical standards. This would include honesty in advertising and in business transaction with customers. Each must also sign a contract committing to adhere to applicable Surface Transportation Board and FMCSA regulations. AMSA also takes into consideration and examines ownership. They are very strict, registration with state corporation commissions. This means that the mover must maintain at least a satisfactory rating with the Better Business Bureau (BBB). As one can imagine, those that pass are authorized to display the ProMove logo on the websites and in marketing materials. However, those that fail will be expelled from the program (and AMSA) if they cannot correct discrepancies during probation.

Signage of business routes varies, depending on the type of route they are derived from. Business routes paralleling U.S. and state highways usually have exactly the same shield shapes and nearly the same overall appearance as the routes they parallel, with a rectangular plate reading "BUSINESS" placed above the shield (either supplementing or replacing the directional plate, depending on the preference of the road agency). In order to better identify and differentiate alternate routes from the routes they parallel, some states such as Maryland are beginning to use green shields for business routes off U.S. highways. In addition, Maryland uses a green shield for business routes off state highways with the word "BUSINESS" in place of "MARYLAND" is used for a state route.

Without strong land use controls, buildings are too often built in town right along a bypass. This results with the conversion of it into an ordinary town road, resulting in the bypass becoming as congested as the local streets. On the contrary, a bypass is intended to avoid such local street congestion. Gas stations, shopping centers, along with various other businesses are often built alongside them. They are built in hopes of easing accessibility, while home are ideally avoided for noise reasons.

The United States Department of Transportation has become a fundamental necessity in the moving industry. It is the pinnacle of the industry, creating and enforcing regulations for the sake of safety for both businesses and consumers alike. However, it is notable to appreciate the history of such a powerful department. The functions currently performed by the DOT were once enforced by the Secretary of Commerce for Transportation. In 1965, Najeeb Halaby, administrator of the Federal Aviation Adminstration (FAA), had an excellent suggestion. He spoke to the current President Lyndon B. Johnson, advising that transportation be elevated to a cabinet level position. He continued, suggesting that the FAA be folded or merged, if you will, into the DOT. Clearly, the President took to Halaby's fresh ideas regarding transportation, thus putting the DOT into place.

There are many different types of trailers that are designed to haul livestock, such as cattle or horses. Most commonly used are the stock trailer, which is enclosed on the bottom but has openings at approximately. This opening is at the eye level of the animals in order to allow ventilation. A horse trailer is a much more elaborate form of stock trailer. Generally horses are hauled with the purpose of attending or participating in competition. Due to this, they must be in peak physical condition, so horse trailers are designed for the comfort and safety of the animals. They're typically well-ventilated with windows and vents along with specifically designed suspension. Additionally, horse trailers have internal partitions that assist animals staying upright during travel. It's also to protect other horses from injuring each other in transit. There are also larger horse trailers that may incorporate more specialized areas for horse tack. They may even include elaborate quarters with sleeping areas, bathroom, cooking facilities etc.

The basics of all trucks are not difficult, as they share common construction. They are generally made of chassis, a cab, an area for placing cargo or equipment, axles, suspension, road wheels, and engine and a drive train. Pneumatic, hydraulic, water, and electrical systems may also be present. Many also tow one or more trailers or semi-trailers, which also vary in multiple ways but are similar as well.

The word cargo is in reference to particular goods that are generally used for commercial gain. Cargo transportation is generally meant to mean by ship, boat, or plane. However, the term now applies to all types of freight, now including goods carried by train, van, or truck. This term is now used in the case of goods in the cold-chain, as perishable inventory is always cargo in transport towards its final home. Even when it is held in climate-controlled facilities, it is important to remember perishable goods or inventory have a short life.

In 1986 Stephen King released horror film "Maximum Overdrive", a campy kind of story. It is really about trucks that become animated due to radiation emanating from a passing comet. Oddly enough, the trucks force humans to pump their diesel fuel. Their leader is portrayed as resembling Spider-Man's antagonist Green Goblin.

The American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) was organized and founded on December 12, 1914. On November 13, 1973, the name was altered to the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. This slight change in name reflects a broadened scope of attention towards all modes of transportation. Despite the implications of the name change, most of the activities it is involved in still gravitate towards highways.

A circumferential route refers to a public transportation system that follows the route in the shape of a circle. Over time a nickname developed in the European Union, calling transportation networks such as these a "ring road". This is no surprise as Europe has several famous "ring roads" such as the Berliner Ring, the Brussels Ring, the Amsterdam Ring, the Boulevard Périphérique around Paris and the Leeds Inner and Outer ring roads. Other countries adopted the term as well which in turn made the name go international. Australia's Melbourne's Western Ring Road and India's Hyderabad's Outer Ring Road both adopted the name. However in Canada, the term is most commonly used, with "orbital" used to a much lesser extent.   On the contrary, the United States calls many "ring roads" as belt-lines, beltways, or loops instead. For example, the Capital Beltway around Washington, D.C. Some ring roads use terminology such as "Inner Loop" and "Outer Loop". This is, of course, for the sake of directional sense, since compass directions cannot be determined around the entire loop.

The Federal-Aid Highway Amendments of 1974 established a federal maximum gross vehicle weight of 80,000 pounds (36,000 kg). It also introduced a sliding scale of truck weight-to-length ratios based on the bridge formula. Although, they did not establish a federal minimum weight limit. By failing to establish a federal regulation, six contiguous in the Mississippi Valley rebelled. Becoming known as the "barrier state", they refused to increase their Interstate weight limits to 80,000 pounds. Due to this, the trucking industry faced a barrier to efficient cross-country interstate commerce.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) conducted a series of tests. These tests were extensive field tests of roads and bridges to assess damages to the pavement. In particular they wanted to know how traffic contributes to the deterioration of pavement materials. These tests essentially led to the 1964 recommendation by AASHTO to Congress. The recommendation determined the gross weight limit for trucks to be determined by a bridge formula table. This includes table based on axle lengths, instead of a state upper limit. By the time 1970 came around, there were over 18 million truck on America's roads.

The term 'trailer' is commonly used interchangeably with that of a travel trailer or mobile home. There are varieties of trailers and manufactures housing designed for human habitation. Such origins can be found historically with utility trailers built in a similar fashion to horse-drawn wagons. A trailer park is an area where mobile homes are designated for people to live in.   In the United States, trailers ranging in size from single-axle dollies to 6-axle, 13 ft 6 in (4,115 mm) high, 53 ft (16,154 mm) in long semi-trailers is common. Although, when towed as part of a tractor-trailer or "18-wheeler", carries a large percentage of the freight. Specifically, the freight that travels over land in North America.

Many people are familiar with this type of moving, using truck rental services, or borrowing similar hardware, is known as DIY moving. Whoever is renting a truck or trailer large enough to carry their household goods may obtain moving equipment if necessary. Equipment may be items such as dollies, furniture pads, and cargo belts to protect furniture and to ease the moving process.

In many countries, driving a truck requires a special driving license. The requirements and limitations vary with each different jurisdiction.

In 1976, the number one hit on the Billboard chart was "Convoy," a novelty song by C.W. McCall about a convoy of truck drivers evading speed traps and toll booths across America. The song inspired the 1978 action film Convoy directed by Sam Peckinpah. After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike and participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis (although similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis).

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 40 million United States citizens have moved annually over the last decade. Of those people who have moved in the United States, 84.5% of them have moved within their own state, 12.5% have moved to another state, and 2.3% have moved to another country.

Many modern trucks are powered by diesel engines, although small to medium size trucks with gas engines exist in the United States. The European Union rules that vehicles with a gross combination of mass up to 3,500 kg (7,716 lb) are also known as light commercial vehicles. Any vehicles exceeding that weight are known as large goods vehicles.

During the latter part of the 20th century, we saw a decline of the trucking culture. Coinciding with this decline was a decline of the image of truck drivers, as they became negatively stigmatized. As a result of such negativity, it makes sense that truck drivers were frequently portrayed as the "bad guy(s)" in movies.

All cars must pass some sort of emission check, such as a smog check to ensure safety. Similarly, trucks are subject to noise emission requirement, which is emanating from the U.S. Noise Control Act. This was intended to protect the public from noise health side effects. The loud noise is due to the way trucks contribute disproportionately to roadway noise. This is primarily due to the elevated stacks and intense tire and aerodynamic noise characteristics.

The year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck". While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as far as to say "motor-powered load carrier".

A moving scam is a scam by a moving company in which the company provides an estimate, loads the goods, then states a much higher price to deliver the goods, effectively holding the goods as lien but does this without do a change of order or revised estimate.

A semi-trailer is almost exactly what it sounds like, it is a trailer without a front axle. Proportionally, its weight is supported by two factors. The weight falls upon a road tractor or by a detachable front axle assembly, known as a dolly. Generally, a semi-trailer is equipped with legs, known in the industry as "landing gear". This means it can be lowered to support it when it is uncoupled. In the United States, a trailer may not exceed a length of 57 ft (17.37 m) on interstate highways. However, it is possible to link two smaller trailers together to reach a length of 63 ft (19.20 m).

In the United States, the Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 established minimum requirements that must be met when a state issues a commercial driver's license CDL. It specifies the following types of license: - Class A CDL drivers. Drive vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater, or any combination of vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater when towing a trailer weighing more than 10,000 pounds. Transports quantities of hazardous materials that require warning placards under Department of Public Safety regulations. - Class A Driver License permits. Is a step in preparation for Class A drivers to become a Commercial Driver. - Class B CDL driver. Class B is designed to transport 16 or more passengers (including driver) or more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation. This includes, but is not limited to, tow trucks, tractor trailers, and buses.

As the American Interstate Highway System began to expand in the 1950's, the trucking industry began to take over a large market share. That is, a large share of the transportation of goods throughout the country. Before this era, trains had been relied on to transport the bulk of the goods cross country or state to state. The Interstate Highway System was influential as it allows for merchandise to travel door to door with ease. Since then, truckload carriers have taken advantage of the interstate system, especially when performing a long distance move. Typically, they bring the merchandise from one distribution center of the country to another part of the country. The increase in truckload freight transportation has reduced the time it takes to transport the goods. Whether the freight was manufactured or produced for the different areas internationally, the time it takes to transport goods has decreased dramatically.  

There are many different types of trailers that are designed to haul livestock, such as cattle or horses. Most commonly used are the stock trailer, which is enclosed on the bottom but has openings at approximately. This opening is at the eye level of the animals in order to allow ventilation. A horse trailer is a much more elaborate form of stock trailer. Generally horses are hauled with the purpose of attending or participating in competition. Due to this, they must be in peak physical condition, so horse trailers are designed for the comfort and safety of the animals. They're typically well-ventilated with windows and vents along with specifically designed suspension. Additionally, horse trailers have internal partitions that assist animals staying upright during travel. It's also to protect other horses from injuring each other in transit. There are also larger horse trailers that may incorporate more specialized areas for horse tack. They may even include elaborate quarters with sleeping areas, bathroom, cooking facilities etc.

Logistics is generally the ability to organize and put in place many complex operations at a single time. It is the management of the flow of things to meet the needs of customers or corporations. Resources managed in logistics includes tangible items such as food, materials, animals, equipment, etc. Not to mention the items that are not tangible such as time and information. This means that the movement of physical items, such as in the moving industry, involves a clear understanding of solid workflow. Such logistics can involve the handling of necessary materials, producing, packaging, inventory, transportation, warehousing, and often security.

The word cargo is in reference to particular goods that are generally used for commercial gain. Cargo transportation is generally meant to mean by ship, boat, or plane. However, the term now applies to all types of freight, now including goods carried by train, van, or truck. This term is now used in the case of goods in the cold-chain, as perishable inventory is always cargo in transport towards its final home. Even when it is held in climate-controlled facilities, it is important to remember perishable goods or inventory have a short life.

The FMCSA has established rules to maintain and regulate the safety of the trucking industry. According to FMCSA rules, driving a goods-carrying CMV more than 11 hours or to drive after having been on duty for 14 hours, is illegal. Due to such heavy driving, they need a break to complete other tasks such as loading and unloading cargo, stopping for gas and other required vehicle inspections, as well as non-working duties such as meal and rest breaks. The 3-hour difference between the 11-hour driving limit and 14 hour on-duty limit gives drivers time to take care of such duties. In addition, after completing an 11 to 14 hour on duty period, the driver much be allowed 10 hours off-duty.

The 1980s were full of happening things, but in 1982 a Southern California truck driver gained short-lived fame. His name was Larry Walters, also known as "Lawn Chair Larry", for pulling a crazy stunt. He ascended to a height of 16,000 feet (4,900 m) by attaching helium balloons to a lawn chair, hence the name. Walters claims he only intended to remain floating near the ground and was shocked when his chair shot up at a rate of 1,000 feet (300 m) per minute. The inspiration for such a stunt Walters claims his poor eyesight for ruining his dreams to become an Air Force pilot.

The American Moving & Storage Association (AMSA) is a non-profit trade association. AMSA represents members of the professional moving industry primarily based in the United States. The association consists of approximately 4,000 members. They consist of van lines, their agents, independent movers, forwarders, and industry suppliers. However, AMSA does not represent the self-storage industry.

Commercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you. Just to name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes. They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways. They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.