Lowpoint Movers Top Rated

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15 Movers in Lowpoint

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LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Beau

“The crew was quick, efficient, and careful. Mad...”

“The crew was quick, efficient, and careful. Made our move very easy. Thank you!”

United States Illinois Lowpoint

LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Alex L.

“By and by, I will be prescribing them to loved ...”

“By and by, I will be prescribing them to loved ones. Regardless they made an awesome showing.”

United States Illinois Lowpoint

LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Cynthis Hopkins

“The moving men were rude, unprofessional, destr...”

“The moving men were rude, unprofessional, destroyed my furniture and damaged the house they were moving me into even ...”

United States Illinois Lowpoint

LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Vicky Parcel

“My son got their name from someone who was very...”

“My son got their name from someone who was very pleased with their move. They were very friendly and detailed, but ev...”

United States Illinois Lowpoint

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Khalil Y.

“Super reasonable, super brisk, they truly know ...”

“Super reasonable, super brisk, they truly know how to hustle. Exceptionally suggested!”

United States Illinois Lowpoint

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Shaira P.

“Exceptionally suggested, and more moderate than...”

“Exceptionally suggested, and more moderate than numerous company.”

United States Illinois Lowpoint

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Sally M.

“Government Johnson Movers takes all the anxiety...”

“Government Johnson Movers takes all the anxiety that accompany moving and transform it into a wonderful, torment free...”

United States Illinois Lowpoint

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Lily E.

“I wouldn't dither to suggest O'Mara Moving and ...”

“I wouldn't dither to suggest O'Mara Moving and Storage. Greatly proficient, precise appraisal, full administration, i...”

United States Illinois Lowpoint

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Sonya C.

“This moving knowledge was a breeze in light of ...”

“This moving knowledge was a breeze in light of these folks! They are moderate and in particular think about your stuf...”

United States Illinois Lowpoint

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Justine

“What a crazy hot day I hate this summer is when...”

“What a crazy hot day I hate this summer is when you have to move. Chicago is in the easiest place to move in the summ...”

United States Illinois Lowpoint

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Kay H.

“Clifton Moving and Storage out of Decatur IL as...”

“Clifton Moving and Storage out of Decatur IL as of late moved us from Springfield IL to Santa Fe NM. I can't say enou...”

United States Illinois Lowpoint

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Sanny L.

“These folks made a phenomenal showing moving me...”

“These folks made a phenomenal showing moving me at the beginning of today. They appeared (with consent) and hour earl...”

United States Illinois Lowpoint

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United States Illinois Lowpoint

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United States Illinois Lowpoint

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United States Illinois Lowpoint

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The FMCSA is a well-known division of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT). It is generally responsible for the enforcement of FMCSA regulations. The driver of a CMV must keep a record of working hours via a log book. This record must reflect the total number of hours spent driving and resting, as well as the time at which the change of duty status occurred. In place of a log book, a motor carrier may choose to keep track of their hours using an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR). This automatically records the amount of time spent driving the vehicle.

In American English, the word "truck" has historically been preceded by a word describing the type of vehicle, such as a "tanker truck". In British English, preference would lie with "tanker" or "petrol tanker".

“The association of truckers with cowboys and related myths was perhaps most obvious during the urban-cowboy craze of the late 1970s, a period that saw middle-class urbanites wearing cowboy clothing and patronizing simulated cowboy nightclubs. During this time, at least four truck driver movies appeared, CB radio became popular, and truck drivers were prominently featured in all forms of popular media.” — Lawrence J. Ouellet

In 1978 Sylvester Stallone starred in the film "F.I.S.T.". The story is loosely based on the 'Teamsters Union'. This union is a labor union which includes truck drivers as well as its then president, Jimmy Hoffa.

The year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck". While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as far as to say "motor-powered load carrier".

There are certain characteristics of a truck that makes it an "off-road truck". They generally standard, extra heavy-duty highway-legal trucks. Although legal, they have off-road features like front driving axle and special tires for applying it to tasks such as logging and construction. The purpose-built off-road vehicles are unconstrained by weighing limits, such as the Libherr T 282B mining truck.

The American Trucking Associations initiated in 1985 with the intent to improve the industry's image. With public opinion declining the association tried numerous moves. One such move was changing the name of the "National Truck Rodeo" to the "National Driving Championship". This was due to the fact that the word rodeo seemed to imply recklessness and reckless driving.

AMSA wanted to help consumers avoid untrustworthy or illegitimate movers. In January 2008, AMSA created the ProMover certification program for its members. As a member, you must have federal interstate operating authority. Members are also required to pass an annual criminal back check, be licensed by the FMCSA, and agree to abide by ethical standards. This would include honesty in advertising and in business transaction with customers. Each must also sign a contract committing to adhere to applicable Surface Transportation Board and FMCSA regulations. AMSA also takes into consideration and examines ownership. They are very strict, registration with state corporation commissions. This means that the mover must maintain at least a satisfactory rating with the Better Business Bureau (BBB). As one can imagine, those that pass are authorized to display the ProMove logo on the websites and in marketing materials. However, those that fail will be expelled from the program (and AMSA) if they cannot correct discrepancies during probation.

“Writer-director James Mottern said he was influenced by nuanced, beloved movies of the 1970s such as "The Last Detail" and "Five Easy Pieces." Mottern said his female trucker character began with a woman he saw at a Southern California truck stop — a "beautiful woman, bleach blonde ... skin tanned to leather walked like a Teamster, blue eyes.” - Paul Brownfield

The United States Department of Transportation has become a fundamental necessity in the moving industry. It is the pinnacle of the industry, creating and enforcing regulations for the sake of safety for both businesses and consumers alike. However, it is notable to appreciate the history of such a powerful department. The functions currently performed by the DOT were once enforced by the Secretary of Commerce for Transportation. In 1965, Najeeb Halaby, administrator of the Federal Aviation Adminstration (FAA), had an excellent suggestion. He spoke to the current President Lyndon B. Johnson, advising that transportation be elevated to a cabinet level position. He continued, suggesting that the FAA be folded or merged, if you will, into the DOT. Clearly, the President took to Halaby's fresh ideas regarding transportation, thus putting the DOT into place.

In the moving industry, transportation logistics management is incredibly important. Essentially, it is the management that implements and controls efficiency, the flow of storage of goods, as well as services. This includes related information between the point of origin and the point of consumption to meet customer's specifications. Logistics is quite complex but can be modeled, analyzed, visualized, and optimized by simulation software. Generally, the goal of transportation logistics management is to reduce or cut the use of such resources. A professional working in the field of moving logistics management is called a logistician.

The Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways is most commonly known as the Interstate Highway System, Interstate Freeway System, Interstate System, or simply the Interstate. It is a network of controlled-access highways that forms a part of the National Highway System of the United States. Named after President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who endorsed its formation, the idea was to have portable moving and storage. Construction was authorized by the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. The original portion was completed 35 years later, although some urban routes were canceled and never built. The network has since been extended and, as of 2013, it had a total length of 47,856 miles (77,017 km), making it the world's second longest after China's. As of 2013, about one-quarter of all vehicle miles driven in the country use the Interstate system. In 2006, the cost of construction had been estimated at about $425 billion (equivalent to $511 billion in 2015).

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a division of the USDOT specializing in highway transportation. The agency's major influential activities are generally separated into two different "programs". The first is the Federal-aid Highway Program. This provides financial aid to support the construction, maintenance, and operation of the U.S. highway network. The second program, the Federal Lands Highway Program, shares a similar name with different intentions. The purpose of this program is to improve transportation involving Federal and Tribal lands. They also focus on preserving "national treasures" for the historic and beatific enjoyment for all.

The American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) was organized and founded on December 12, 1914. On November 13, 1973, the name was altered to the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. This slight change in name reflects a broadened scope of attention towards all modes of transportation. Despite the implications of the name change, most of the activities it is involved in still gravitate towards highways.

In 1984 the animated TV series The Transformers told the story of a group of extraterrestrial humanoid robots. However, it just so happens that they disguise themselves as automobiles. Their leader of the Autobots clan, Optimus Prime, is depicted as an awesome semi-truck.

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry. There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine. Improvement in transmissions is yet another source, just like the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.   The first state weight limits for trucks were determined and put in place in 1913. Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads. As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and a maximum speed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks to mostly urban areas.

By the time 2006 came, there were over 26 million trucks on the United States roads, each hauling over 10 billion short tons of freight (9.1 billion long tons). This was representing almost 70% of the total volume of freight. When, as a driver or an automobile drivers, most automobile drivers are largely unfamiliar with large trucks. As as a result of these unaware truck drivers and their massive 18-wheeler's numerous blind spots. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has determined that 70% of fatal automobile/tractor trailer accident happen for a reason. That being the result of "unsafe actions of automobile drivers". People, as well as drivers, need to realize the dangers of such large trucks and pay more attention. Likewise for truck drivers as well.

The Federal-Aid Highway Amendments of 1974 established a federal maximum gross vehicle weight of 80,000 pounds (36,000 kg). It also introduced a sliding scale of truck weight-to-length ratios based on the bridge formula. Although, they did not establish a federal minimum weight limit. By failing to establish a federal regulation, six contiguous in the Mississippi Valley rebelled. Becoming known as the "barrier state", they refused to increase their Interstate weight limits to 80,000 pounds. Due to this, the trucking industry faced a barrier to efficient cross-country interstate commerce.

In today's popular culture, recreational vehicles struggle to find their own niche. Travel trailers or mobile home with limited living facilities, or where people can camp or stay have been referred to as trailers. Previously, many would refer to such vehicles as towable trailers.

Words have always had a different meaning or have been used interchangeably with others across all cultures. In the United States, Canada, and the Philippines the word "truck" is mostly reserved for larger vehicles. Although in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, the word "truck" is generally reserved for large vehicles. In Australia and New Zealand, a pickup truck is usually called a ute, short for "utility". While over in South Africa it is called a bakkie (Afrikaans: "small open container"). The United Kingdom, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Ireland, and Hong Kong use the "lorry" instead of truck, but only for medium and heavy types.