Perkins Moving Company

USDOT # 502919
1807 E 71ST Street
Chicago, IL 60649
Chicago
Illinois
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (773) 667-8702
Company Site:

Moving with Perkins Moving Company

Perkins Moving Company has been in the business for over 30 years and has many repeat customers in Chicago, Illinois.


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These folks are magnificent! Appeared on time and motivated right to work. Super expert and extremely quick!

The group were just incredible! We have a very late demand and they obliged us so brilliantly. Do I suggest their administrations as well as I firmly urge you to get in touch with them with all you're moving requirements.

Stanley Perkins is the most flawlessly awesome. I've utilized Perkins Moving on three separate events; two long separation and one around the local area and every experience was simple peasy with all my stuff in place. Sticker numbers, genuine value evaluates that don't change amid the move, straight up business.

Did You Know

QuestionIn the United States, shipments larger than about 7,000 kg (15,432 lb)are classifiedas truckload freight (TL). It is more efficient and affordable for a large shipment to have exclusive use of one larger trailer. Thisis opposedto having to share space on a smaller Less than Truckload freight carrier.

QuestionThe public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations.However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time.The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's theywere depictedas heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road.Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as theywere glorifiedas modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's.Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

QuestionThe USDOT (USDOT or DOT)is considereda federal Cabinet department within the U.S. government.Clearly, this department concerns itself with all aspects of transportation with safety as a focal point.The DOT wasofficiallyestablished by an act of Congress on October 15, 1966, beginning its operation on April 1, 1967. Superior to the DOT, the United States Secretary of Transportation governs the department.The mission of the DOT is to "Serve the United States by ensuring a fast, safe, efficient, accessible, and convenient transportation system that meets our vital national interests and enhances the quality of life for the American people, today and into the future." Essentially thisstates how important it is to improve all types of transportation as a way to enhance both safety and life in general etc.It is important to note that the DOT is not in place to hurt businesses, but to improve our "vital national interests" and our "quality of life". The transportation networks are in definite need of such fundamental attention. Federal departments such as the USDOT are key to this industry by creating and enforcing regulations with intentions to increase the efficiency and safety of transportation. 

QuestionBusiness routes generally follow the original routing of the numbered route through a city or town.Beginning in the 1930s and lasting thru the 1970s was an era marking a peak in large-scale highway construction in the United States. U.S. Highways and Interstates weretypicallybuilt in particular phases.Their first phase of development began with the numbered route carrying traffic through the center of a city or town.The second phase involved the construction of bypasses around the central business districts of the towns they began.As bypass construction continued, original parts of routes that had once passed straight thru a city would often become a "business route".

QuestionThe 1950's were quite different than the years to come.They were more likely tobe considered"Knights of the Road", if you will, for helping stranded travelers.In these times truck driverswere enviedandwere viewedas an opposition to the book "The Organization Man".Bestseller in 1956, author William H. Whyte's novel describes "the man in the gray flannel suit", who sat in an office every day.He's describing a typical office style job that is very structured with managers watching over everyone. Truck drivers represented the opposite of all these concepts. Popular trucking songs glorified the life of drivers as independent "wanderers".Yet, there were attempts to bring back the factory style efficiency, such as using tachnographs. Although most attempts resulted in little success. Driversroutinelysabotaged and discovered new ways to falsify the machine's records.