New World Van Lines

USDOT # 258748
5875 N Rogers Avenue
Chicago, IL 60290
Chicago
Illinois
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (773) 509-5938
Company Site: www.nwvl.com

Moving with New World Van Lines

To create a competitive advantage through effective use of the individual and collective talents of our people.
To use the latest in technology to advance our ability to better serve our national accounts.
To maintain an overriding commitment to customer satisfaction and a mutually beneficial partnership.
To preserve the health, safety, and dignity of our employees, our customers, and the environment in which we operate.
To challenge ourselves to continually improve in what we do.



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Your New World Van Lines Reviews

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We were to a great degree fulfilled by the administration we got! Our turn organizer Maureen was the best, she offered us smooth all the minor issues as they some assistance with coming up, made us feel we were never alone amid the move and we settled in our home with no issue. She was likewise exceptionally accommodating to help us with the further needs like getting some additional boxes we unloaded ourselves to be gotten, or one of the beds' legs to be settled in such a brief timeframe! I would likewise need to recognize the quick and additional cautious administration we got with our pressing group in VA. Much thanks to you!

Did You Know

QuestionBeginning the the early 20th century, the 1920's saw several major advancements. There was improvement in rural roads which was significant for the time.The diesel engine, which are 25-40% more efficient than gas engines were also a major breakthrough.We also saw the standardization of truck and trailer sizes along with fifth wheel coupling systems. Additionally power assisted brakes and steering developed. By 1933, all states had some form of varying truck weight regulation.

QuestionMany modern trucksare powered bydiesel engines, although small to medium size trucks with gas engines exist in the United States.The European Union rules that vehicles with a gross combination of mass up to 3,500 kg (7,716 lb) are also known as light commercial vehicles. Any vehicles exceeding that weightare knownas large goods vehicles.

QuestionDOT officers of each state are generally in charge of the enforcement of the Hours of Service (HOS). These are sometimes checked when CMVs pass through weigh stations. Drivers found to be in violation of the HOS canbe forcedto stop driving for a certain period of time. This, in turn, maynegativelyaffect the motor carrier's safety rating. Requests to change the HOS are a source of debate. Unfortunately, many surveysindicatedriversroutinelyget away with violating the HOS.Such facts have started yet another debate on whether motor carriers shouldbe requiredto us EOBRs in their vehicles.Relying on paper-based log books does not always seem to enforce the HOS law put in place for the safety of everyone.

Question

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry.There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine.Improvement in transmissions is yet another source,justlike the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.
The first state weight limits for truckswere determinedand put in place in 1913.Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads.As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and amaximumspeed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks tomostlyurban areas.

QuestionWith the ending of World War I, several developmentswere madeto enhance trucks.Such an example would be by putting pneumatic tires replaced thepreviouslycommon full rubber versions.These advancements continued, including electric starters, power brakes, 4, 6, and 8 cylinder engines. Closed cabs and electric lighting followed. The modern semi-trailer truck also debuted.Additionally, touring car builders such as Ford and Renault entered the heavy truck market.