Sun Valley Transfer & Storage

USDOT # 200826
1041 Airport Way
Hailey, ID 83333
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (208) 788-9343
Company Site:

Moving with Sun Valley Transfer & Storage

Sun Valley Transfer & Storage provides indisputable overhaul to our clients as we attempt to fulfil our clients wants.
Sun Valley Transfer & Storage takes into consideration the view and critiquing our clients may get.
Customers have told us Sun Valley Transfer & Storage is in the area and our Sun Valley Transfer & Storage reviews below reflect enlightening remark.

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They were dependable, proficient and came through with each one of their guarantees.

This is our second time utilizing these folks and the second time they have come in under appraisal. These folks are quick, proficient workhorses. In the event that we ever need to move again we will utilize them again. Much obliged!!!

Did You Know

QuestionThe interstate moving industry in the United States maintains regulation by the FMCSA, which is part of the USDOT.With only a small staff (fewer than 20 people) available to patrol hundreds of moving companies, enforcement is difficult.As a result of such a small staff, there arein many cases, no regulations that qualify moving companies as 'reliable'. Without this guarantee, it is difficult to a consumer to make a choice. Although, moving companies can provide and often display a DOT license.

QuestionAMSA wanted to help consumers avoid untrustworthy or illegitimate movers. In January 2008, AMSA created the ProMover certification program for its members. As a member, you must have federal interstate operating authority.Members are also required to pass an annual criminal back check,be licensed bythe FMCSA, and agree to abide by ethical standards. This would include honesty in advertising and in business transaction with customers.Each must also sign a contract committing to adhere to applicable Surface Transportation Board and FMCSA regulations. AMSA also takes into consideration and examines ownership. They are very strict, registration with state corporation commissions.This means that the mover must maintain at least a satisfactory rating with the Better Business Bureau (BBB).As one can imagine, those that passare authorizedto display the ProMove logo on the websites and in marketing materials.However, those that fail willbe expelledfrom the program (and AMSA) if they cannot correct discrepancies during probation.


In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period.At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.
The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty tobe usedfor meals and rest breaks.This meant that the weekly maxwas limitedto 60 hours over 7 days (non-dailydrivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

QuestionIn today's popular culture, recreational vehicles struggle to find their own niche.Travel trailers or mobile home with limited living facilities, or where people can camp or stay havebeen referredto as trailers.Previously, many would refer to such vehicles as towable trailers.

QuestionWords have always had a different meaning or havebeen usedinterchangeablywith others across all cultures.In the United States, Canada, and the Philippines the word "truck" ismostlyreserved for larger vehicles.Although in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, the word "truck" is generally reserved for large vehicles. In Australia and New Zealand, a pickup truck is usually called a ute, short for "utility". While over in South Africa it is called a bakkie (Afrikaans: "small open container").The United Kingdom, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Ireland, and Hong Kong use the "lorry" instead of truck, but only for medium and heavy types.