Air Van

USDOT # 305340
3340 Suth Denver Way
Boise, ID 83705
Boise
Idaho
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (425) 629-4101
Company Site: www.airvanmoving.com/household-moving/boise-movers/

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I certainly suggest this company. Much obliged to you for an extraordinary service and for keeping up to your guarantee.

My spouse and I needed to move one square over however we just couldn't do it all alone. We chose to contract movers and ran with Air Van on account of their extremely focused cost and stellar audits.

Did You Know

Question“The association of truckers with cowboys and related myths was perhaps most obvious during the urban-cowboy craze of the late 1970s, a period that saw middle-class urbanites wearing cowboy clothing and patronizing simulated cowboy nightclubs. During this time, at least four truck driver movies appeared, CB radio became popular, and truck drivers were prominently featured in all forms of popular media.” — Lawrence J. Ouellet

QuestionIn 1999, The Simpsons episode Maximum Homerdrive aired. It featured Homer and Bart making a delivery for a truck driver named Red after he unexpectedly dies of 'food poisoning'.

QuestionIn 1971, author and director Steven Spielberg, debuted his first feature length film. His made-for-tv film, Duel, portrayed a truck driver as an anonymous stalker.Apparentlythere seems to be a trend in the 70's tonegativelystigmatize truck drivers.

QuestionBusiness routes always have the same number as the routes they parallel. For example, U.S. 1 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, U.S. Route 1, and Interstate 40 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, Interstate 40.

QuestionThe term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry.This is where the wordis knownto havebeen usedin 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage)specificallya large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin.It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911.Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry"was usedfor a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.