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Spring Hill is located at 28°28′44″N 82°32′52″W  /  28.47889°N 82.54778°W  / 28.47889; -82.54778 (28.478929, & 82.547732). According to the United States Census Bureau , the CDP has a total area of 54.8 square miles (142 km 2 ), of which 53.1 square miles (138 km 2 ) is land and 1.7 square miles (4.4 km 2 ) (3.12%) is water.
Did You Know

QuestionWith the partial deregulation of the trucking industry in 1980 by the Motor Carrier Act, trucking companies increased. The workforce wasdrasticallyde-unionized. As a result, drivers received a lower payoverall.Losing its spotlight in the popular culture, trucking had become less intimate as some unspoken competition broke out.However, the deregulation only increased the competition and productivity with the trucking industry as a whole. This was beneficial to the America consumer by reducing costs.In 1982 the Surface TransportationAssistanceAct established a federalminimumtruck weight limits. Thus, trucks were finally standardized truck size and weight limits across the country.This was also put in to place so that across country traffic on the Interstate Highways resolved the issue of the 'barrier states'.


In the United States, commercial truck classificationis fixed byeach vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8.Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty.The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks.Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS,formerlyknown as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).


Although there are exceptions, city routes areinterestinglymost often found in the Midwestern area of the United States. Though theyessentiallyserve the same purpose as business routes, they are different. They feature "CITY" signs as opposed to "BUSINESS" signs above or below route shields. Many of these city routes are becoming irrelevant for today's transportation. Due to this, they are being eliminated in favor of the business route designation.

QuestionThe 1980s were full of happening things, but in 1982 a Southern California truck driver gained short-lived fame. His name was Larry Walters, also known as "Lawn Chair Larry", for pulling a crazy stunt. He ascended to a height of 16,000 feet (4,900 m) by attaching helium balloons to a lawn chair, hence the name.Walters claims he only intended to remain floating near the ground andwas shockedwhen his chair shot up at a rate of 1,000 feet (300 m) per minute.The inspiration for such a stunt Walters claims his poor eyesight for ruining his dreams to become an Air Force pilot.

QuestionThe American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) conducted a series of tests.These tests were extensive field tests of roads and bridges to assess damages to the pavement.In particular they wanted to know how traffic contributes to the deterioration of pavement materials. These testsessentiallyled to the 1964 recommendation by AASHTO to Congress.The recommendation determined the gross weight limit for trucks tobe determined bya bridge formula table. This includes table based on axle lengths, instead of a state upper limit. By the time 1970 came around, there were over 18 million truck on America's roads.


The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry.There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine.Improvement in transmissions is yet another source,justlike the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.
The first state weight limits for truckswere determinedand put in place in 1913.Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads.As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and amaximumspeed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks tomostlyurban areas.