American Transfer & Storage Moving

USDOT # 1719367
3495 North Alcaniz Street
Pensacola, FL 32503
Pensacola
Florida
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (850) 434-2751
Company Site:

Moving with American Transfer & Storage Moving

When you move with Haynes Van & Storage, you move with friends and neighbors – people who live in and care about your community.
Haynes Van & Storage has been moving families in the Pensacola area since 1954 and is known in the region for its quality service and competitive pricing.
We specialize in local moving, but also can handle any type of residential or business move anywhere across the state or country, or around the globe.
Owner Keith Haynes is a third-generation family member of the company founders and takes personal pride in each move. Not only is his name connected to each move – he and his family and colleagues are very connected to the community. Starting with Keith’s grandparents, company founders Lamar “Shorty” and Lou Haynes and their son Butch, who owned and operated the business for over forty years, family members and Haynes Van & Storage employees have worked and volunteered in a variety of organizations throughout the Pensacola area.
Haynes Van & Storage provides local moving services in and around Pensacola, Gulf Breeze, Pace, Milton, Fort Walton Beach, Destin, Navarre and Perdido Key.
In addition to traditional moving services, Haynes Van & Storage also offers short- and long-term storage solutions, containerized moving solutions, small move options, value-added services, such as cash back opportunities on your move, electronics hookups and more.



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Your American Transfer & Storage Moving Reviews

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This is our second time utilizing these folks and the second time they have come in UNDER assessment. These folks are quick, proficient workhorses.

In the event that we ever need to move again we will utilize them again.

I had a beginning issue and it was resolved..they do care what clients think and are upbeat

Did You Know

QuestionAccording to the U.S. Census Bureau, 40 million United States citizens have moved annually over the last decade. Of those people who have moved in the United States, 84.5% of them have moved within their own state, 12.5% have moved to another state, and 2.3% have moved to another country.

Question

In the moving industry, transportation logistics management isincrediblyimportant.Essentially, it is the management that implements and controls efficiency, the flow of storage of goods, as well as services.This includes related information between the point of origin and the point of consumption to meet customer's specifications.Logistics is quite complex but canbe modeled, analyzed, visualized, and optimized by simulation software.Generally, the goal of transportation logistics management is to reduce or cut the use of such resources.A professional working in the field of moving logistics managementis calleda logistician.

QuestionWith the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media.Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving.He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry.It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamiltoncertainlytakes an interesting perspectivehistoricallyspeaking.

QuestionDriver's licensing has coincided throughout the European Unionin order tofor the complex rules to all member states.Driving a vehicle weighing more than 7.5 tons (16,535 lb) for commercial purposes requires a certain license. This specialist licence type varies depending on the use of the vehicle and number of seat.Licences first acquired after 1997, the weightwas reducedto 3,500 kilograms (7,716 lb), not including trailers.

QuestionHeavy trucks. A cement mixer is an example of Class 8 heavy trucks. Heavy trucks are the largest on-road trucks, Class 8. These include vocational applications such as heavy dump trucks, concrete pump trucks, and refuse hauling, as well as ubiquitous long-haul 6×4 and 4x2 tractor units. Road damage and wear increase very rapidly with the axle weight. The axle weight is the truck weight divided by the number of axles, but the actual axle weight depends on the position of the load over the axles. The number of steering axles and the suspension type also influence the amount of the road wear. In many countries with good roads, a six-axle truck may have a maximum weight over 50 tons (49 long tons; 55 short tons).