Real Movers Moving & Storage

USDOT # 2861433
150 NW 176th St Ste E
Miami, FL 33169
Miami
Florida
Contact Phone: 1 844 653 1407
Additional Phone: (718) 313-6559
Company Site: realmovingmovers.com

Moving with Real Movers Moving & Storage

Real Movers Moving & Storage provides positive services to our consumers as we attempt to fulfil our clients demands.
Real Movers Moving & Storage can send your property in your local area from your old stead to your stain unexampled place.
clients have told us Real Movers Moving & Storage is in the area and our Real Movers Moving & Storage reviews below reflect informative comments.




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Working with Real Movers Moving and Storage was a great experience. When we move our family from Florida to Kentucky we were worried about moving because in the past we had problems with movers. However, this time we had none. These guys made our transition awesome. I highly recommend Real Movers.

I absolutely hate moving However, I just received an exciting job in Kansas. As a result I needed to move from Florida to Kansas for a job. Real Movers Moving and Storage went above and beyond to help me with this difficult process. The one thing I was worried about was items breaking. Especially some items my grandma gave me before she passed away last year. Once they got to my new home, not a thing was broken. To see that all of my valuables made it safely across the country was a relief. I would definitely hire this company again!

Did You Know

QuestionInvented in 1890, the diesel engine was not an invention that became well known in popular culture.It was not until the 1930's for the United States to express further interest for diesel engines tobe accepted.Gasoline engines were still in use on heavy trucks in the 1970's, while in Europe they had beenentirelyreplaced two decades earlier.

QuestionA moving scam is a scam by a moving company in which the company provides an estimate, loads the goods, then states a much higher price to deliver the goods, effectively holding the goods as lien but does this without do a change of order or revised estimate.

Question

In the United States, commercial truck classificationis fixed byeach vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8.Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty.The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks.Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS,formerlyknown as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

Question

The Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula is a mathematical formula used in the United Statesto determine the appropriate gross weight for a long distance moving vehicle, based on the axle number and spacing. Enforced bythe Department of Transportation upon long-haul truck drivers, it is used as a means of preventing heavy vehicles from damaging roads and bridges.This is especially in particular to the total weight of a loaded truck, whetherbeing usedfor commercial moving services or for long distance moving services in general.
According to the Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula, the total weight of a loaded truck (tractor and trailer, 5-axle rig) cannot exceed 80,000 lbs in the United States.Under ordinary circumstances, long-haul equipment trucks will weight about 15,000 kg (33,069 lbs). This leaves about 20,000 kg (44,092 lbs) of freight capacity.Likewise, a loadis limitedto the space available in the trailer,normallywith dimensions of 48 ft (14.63 m) or 53 ft (16.15 m) long, 2.6 m (102.4 in) wide, 2.7 m (8 ft 10.3 in) high and 13 ft 6 in or 4.11 m high.

Question

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry.There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine.Improvement in transmissions is yet another source,justlike the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.
The first state weight limits for truckswere determinedand put in place in 1913.Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads.As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and amaximumspeed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks tomostlyurban areas.