Lords Quick & Cheap Moving

USDOT # 1967709
7136 South Military Trial Suite #6
Lake Worth, FL 33463
Lake Worth
Florida
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (561) 734-6302
Company Site: www.lordsmoving.com

Moving with Lords Quick & Cheap Moving

Since 1989, Lord's Moving has brought integrity back to the South Florida moving business, treating customers with the respect they deserve. With over 20 years experience, each employee is bonded, and your goods are insured up to $50,000. Family owned, we are licensed with the state and county (#IM1109 and #MVP729), and we stand behind our work.
WE VALUE WHAT'S IMPORTANT TO YOU...
With prices as much as 30% less than our competitors and same or next day service, we take the fear and anxiety out of moving. If another company is at the move site and is raising their quote, give us a call and we will come to the rescue and save you money. We value each customer, regardless of the size of the job. We will schedule your move in a two hour window so you are not waiting around wondering when or if someone will show. We will arrive with a team of no less than 2-3 movers, and we will not pass you over for a bigger job. We will take your goods directly to your location, not to a warehouse to sit and collect dust.
Whether you are headed down the street or across the state, you will complete your move with a smile on your face...guaranteed!



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LIARS, CHEATS, SNAKES!

Utilize ONLY IF YOU NEVER WANT TO SEE YOUR THINGS AGAIN! THEY HAVE HAD DOZENS OF COMPLAINTS LODGED AGAINST THEM. Puts on a show TO BE A DOCTOR - MY ITEMS ARRIVED TWO MONTHS LATE IN TATTERS! More than 6000.00 DAMAGE TO THE MOTORCYCLE ALONE! Need TO TAKE TO COURT TO SEE A PENNY!

Did You Know

QuestionBusiness routes always have the same number as the routes they parallel. For example, U.S. 1 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, U.S. Route 1, and Interstate 40 Business is a loop off, and paralleling, Interstate 40.

Question

The Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula is a mathematical formula used in the United Statesto determine the appropriate gross weight for a long distance moving vehicle, based on the axle number and spacing. Enforced bythe Department of Transportation upon long-haul truck drivers, it is used as a means of preventing heavy vehicles from damaging roads and bridges.This is especially in particular to the total weight of a loaded truck, whetherbeing usedfor commercial moving services or for long distance moving services in general.
According to the Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula, the total weight of a loaded truck (tractor and trailer, 5-axle rig) cannot exceed 80,000 lbs in the United States.Under ordinary circumstances, long-haul equipment trucks will weight about 15,000 kg (33,069 lbs). This leaves about 20,000 kg (44,092 lbs) of freight capacity.Likewise, a loadis limitedto the space available in the trailer,normallywith dimensions of 48 ft (14.63 m) or 53 ft (16.15 m) long, 2.6 m (102.4 in) wide, 2.7 m (8 ft 10.3 in) high and 13 ft 6 in or 4.11 m high.

QuestionThe Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issues Hours of Service regulations.At the same time, they govern the working hours of anyone operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in the United States.Such regulations apply to truck drivers, commercial and city bus drivers, and school bus drivers who operate CMVs. With these rules in place, the number of daily and weekly hours spent driving and workingis limited.The FMCSA regulates theminimumamount of time drivers must spend resting between driving shifts. In regards to intrastate commerce, the respective state's regulations apply.

QuestionThroughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route mostcommonlyused on an alternative routing of a highway around a town.Specificallywhen the main route of the highway goes through the town.Originally, these routeswere designatedas "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns.However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass".Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.

QuestionWords have always had a different meaning or havebeen usedinterchangeablywith others across all cultures.In the United States, Canada, and the Philippines the word "truck" ismostlyreserved for larger vehicles.Although in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, the word "truck" is generally reserved for large vehicles. In Australia and New Zealand, a pickup truck is usually called a ute, short for "utility". While over in South Africa it is called a bakkie (Afrikaans: "small open container").The United Kingdom, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Ireland, and Hong Kong use the "lorry" instead of truck, but only for medium and heavy types.