Veteran Movers

USDOT # 2281126
1266 E Main Street Suite 700R
Stamford, CT 06902
Stamford
Connecticut
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (347) 737-8611
Company Site: www.veteranmoversnyc.com

Moving with Veteran Movers

Veteran Movers NYC is unique among the host of moving companies that dot the New York landscape. It was founded in 2011 by a former Marine who, after leaving the service and working for a local moving company in Brooklyn, decided to branch out on his own. With the twin goalswasd of owning his own moving company and supporting fellow US veterans by providing them with job opportunities at the same time, he established VMNYC. Today, the organization is fully staffed by a “band of brothers” who, after serving their country overseas, is now serving New York City’s burgeoning moving needs.




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Your Veteran Movers Reviews

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I've moved with Veteran twice, once within Brooklyn and the other from Brooklyn to Manhattan, both times were amazing. The quoting and booking process is simple to start and your inventory is always open for adjustment should you sell anything, etc. a few days prior to your move.

The movers themselves showed up within minutes of our scheduled appointment time and are all around great guys. They treat your things like it's their own and bust ass the entire time. I'd recommend Veteran to anyone considering a move within NYC.

Awesome administration, super proficient, polite, on time, and at an immaculate cost. I can't praise them enough. Highly recommended.

Did You Know

QuestionTrucks and cars have much in commonmechanicallyas well asancestrally.One link between them is the steam-powered fardier Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built it in 1769. Unfortunately for him, steam trucks were notreallycommon until the mid 1800's. While looking at thispractically, it would be much harder to have a steam truck. This ismostlydue to the fact that the roads of the timewere builtfor horse and carriages. Steam truckswere leftto very short hauls, usually from a factory to the nearest railway station.In 1881, the first semi-trailer appeared, and it was in fact towed by a steam tractor manufactured by De Dion-Bouton.Steam-powered truckswere soldin France and in the United States,apparentlyuntil the eve of World War I. Also, at the beginning of World War II in the United Kingdom, theywere knownas 'steam wagons'.

Question

Truckload shipping is the movement of large amounts of cargo.In general, they move amounts necessary to fill an entire semi-trailer or inter-modal container.A truckload carrier is a trucking company that generally contracts an entire trailer-load to a single customer. This is quite the opposite of a Less than Truckload (LTL) freight services.Less than Truckload shipping services generally mix freight from several customers in each trailer.An advantage Full Truckload shipping carriers have over Less than Truckload carrier services is that the freight isn't handled during the trip.Yet, in an LTL shipment, goods will generallybe transportedon several different trailers.

QuestionThe basics of all trucks are not difficult, as they share common construction.They are generally made of chassis, a cab, an area for placing cargo or equipment, axles, suspension, road wheels, and engine and a drive train. Pneumatic, hydraulic, water, and electrical systems may also be present. Many also tow one or more trailers or semi-trailers, which also vary inmultipleways but are similar as well.

QuestionIn order toload or unloadbotsand other cargo to and from a trailer, trailer winchesare designedfor this purpose. They consist of a ratchet mechanism and cable. The handle on the ratchet mechanism is then turned to tighten or loosen the tension on the winch cable. Trailer winches vary, some are manual while othersare motorized. Trailer winches are mosttypicallyfound on the front of the trailer by towing an A-frame.

QuestionCommercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you.Justto name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes.They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways.They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.