BVJ Associates Moving

USDOT # 874157
705 E Nichols BLVD
Colorado Springs, CO 80907
Colorado Springs
Colorado
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (729) 633-3714
Company Site:

Moving with BVJ Associates Moving

BVJ Associates Moving is one of the listed relocation companies in your area.
BVJ Associates Moving takes into condition the thinking and critiquing our customers may feature.
clients have told us BVJ Associates Moving is in the district and our BVJ Associates Moving reviews below reflect enlightening remark.




See More Moving companies in Colorado Springs, Colorado

Your BVJ Associates Moving Reviews

required
required (not published)

I reached BVJ Associates Moving to move us from Colorado to Virginia. I was ignorant that Allied and N. American have joined forces. I've utilized Allied as a part of the past effectively yet have had issues with N. American. So I was astounded to discover the estimator was from Great Plains, not the Allied organization I called. However, BVJ Associates Moving awed me, and was among the most reduced bidders.

Did You Know

QuestionThe United States' Interstate Highway System is full of bypasses and loops with the designation of a three-digit number.Usually beginning with an even digit, it is important to note that this pattern ishighlyinconsistent. For example, in Des Moines, Iowa the genuine bypass is the main route.Morespecifically, it is Interstate 35 and Interstate 80, with the loop into downtown Des Moines being Interstate 235. As itis illustratedin this example, they do not alwaysconsistentlybegin with an even number.However, the 'correct' designationis exemplifiedin Omaha, Nebraska.In Omaha, Interstate 480 traverses the downtown area, whichis bypassed byInterstate 80, Interstate 680, and Interstate 95. Interstate 95 then in turn goes through Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Furthermore, Interstate 295 is the bypass around Philadelphia, which leads into New Jersey.Although this can all be rather confusing, it is most important to understand the Interstate Highway System and the role bypasses play.

QuestionAs of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA)was establishedas its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999".The FMCSAis basedin Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia.Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

Question

Implemented in 2014, the National Registry, requires all Medical Examiners (ME) who conduct physical examinations and issue medical certifications for interstate CMV drivers to complete training on FMCSA’s physical qualification standards, must pass a certification test. This is to demonstrate competence through periodic training and testing. CMV drivers whose medical certifications expire must use MEs on the National Registry for their examinations.


FMCSA has reached its goal of at least 40,000 certified MEs signing onto the registry. All this means is that drivers or movers can now find certified medical examiners throughout the country who can perform their medical exam. FMCSA is preparing to issue a follow-on “National Registry 2” rule stating new requirements. In this case, MEs are to submit medical certificate information on a daily basis. These daily updates are sent to the FMCSA, which will then be sent to the states electronically. This process will dramatically decrease the chance of drivers falsifying medical cards.

QuestionThe Federal-Aid Highway Amendments of 1974 established a federalmaximum gross vehicle weight of 80,000 pounds (36,000 kg).It also introduced a sliding scale of truck weight-to-length ratios based on the bridge formula. Although, they did not establish a federalminimumweight limit.By failing to establish a federal regulation, six contiguous in the Mississippi Valley rebelled.Becoming known as the "barrier state", they refused to increase their Interstate weight limits to 80,000 pounds.Due to this, the trucking industry faced a barrier to efficient cross-country interstate commerce.

QuestionCommercial trucks in the U.S. pay higher road taxes on a State level than the road vehicles and are subject to extensive regulation. This begs the question of why these trucks are paying more. I'll tell you.Justto name a few reasons, commercial truck pay higher road use taxes.They are much bigger and heavier than most other vehicles, resulting in more wear and tear on the roadways.They are also on the road for extended periods of time, which also affects the interstate as well as roads and passing through towns. Yet, rules on use taxes differ among jurisdictions.