San Francisco Movers Top Rated

(888) 787-7813

109 Movers in San Francisco

Sponsored

LAST REVIEW

user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Francisco

LAST REVIEW

user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Francisco

LAST REVIEW

user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Francisco

LAST REVIEW

user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Francisco

LAST REVIEW

user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Francisco

LAST REVIEW

user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Francisco

LAST REVIEW

user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Francisco

LAST REVIEW

user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Francisco

LAST REVIEW

user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Francisco

LAST REVIEW

user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Francisco

LAST REVIEW

user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Francisco

LAST REVIEW

user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Francisco

LAST REVIEW

user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Francisco

LAST REVIEW

user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Francisco

LAST REVIEW

user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Francisco

The Art of Cutting Your Moving Costs: How to Save Your Cash

  • Make sure you’re not making your movers walk over 75 feet from the moving space to the truck, or vice versa. This is called a long carry fee, and it should be avoided.
  • Score some free moving boxes from local stores, universities, and offices in your area.
  • Wrap your kitchen dishes in shirts, and your stemware in clean pairs of socks. This way, you’re not shelling out for newspapers and the bonus of this is that ink won’t get all over everything you touch!
  • Select movers who use GPS. They will drive the fastest routes, which translates to a lower drive time, and more money in your pocket.

Why Hiring Professional Movers Is a Good Idea — And How To Find The Best

  • Movers San Francisco understand the ins and outs of relocation and can do the job fast.
  • Professionals are fully vetted and thoroughly trained when they’re hired as San Francisco movers, so you’re getting a passionate crew of movers SF who want to see your move happen successfully.
  • All your items are insured against accidental mishaps when you move with professionals, which is something that you don’t have when you take the DIY route.
  • The SF movers you will hire are local experts in the area, which comes in handy when you’re moving from out of town.



Relocation Tips For Moving To San Francisco



Don’t Let These Rogue Mover Scams Happen to You

  • If your San Francisco mover doesn’t fully explain the charges on the contract prior to signing, they aren’t interested in giving their customer the greatest satisfaction possible. Ask for clarification, or replace them.
  • If your movers are sloppy, not in a uniform, and not energetic, they might be day laborers who are just looking for a paycheck rather than moving your items with care.
  • Make sure that your prospective moving San Francisco company is licensed by the USDOT and the FMCSA. This is imperative to ensure that your company is practicing legally and safely.
  • Ask to see that the company has a tariff. This is a legal document which states the company’s terms and conditions and without it, the moving company would fail an inspection with the USDOT.


Who Here Wants An Easier Move to SF?

  • Moving Authority has all the information you need when it comes to local and long distance moving and storage companies across the United States.
  • If you're looking for a full service moving company, you can read the reviews on our website to see if you would like to go with a mover for your move.
  • If you are looking for moving services San Francisco for a residential move or a business and office move, Moving Authority always has a list of the best movers for the job.
  • We also have tips for when you move such as saving money on moving supplies.
  • For some more information, please send us an email at support@movingauthority.com or give us a call at 702-333-2430.
  • Our associates will be on the line to answer your questions about moving and storage.

Do you know?

Do you know quotes

In 2009, the book 'Trucking Country: The Road to America's Walmart Economy' debuted, written by author Shane Hamilton. This novel explores the interesting history of trucking and connects certain developments. Particularly how such development in the trucking industry have helped the so-called big-box stored. Examples of these would include Walmart or Target, they dominate the retail sector of the U.S. economy. Yet, Hamilton connects historical and present-day evidence that connects such correlations.

In 1895 Karl Benz designed and built the first truck in history by using the internal combustion engine. Later that year some of Benz's trucks gave into modernization and went on to become the first bus by the Netphener. This would be the first motor bus company in history. Hardly a year later, in 1986, another internal combustion engine truck was built by a man named Gottlieb Daimler. As people began to catch on, other companies, such as Peugeot, Renault, and Bussing, also built their own versions. In 1899, the first truck in the United States was built by Autocar and was available with two optional horsepower motors, 5 or 8.

Receiving nation attention during the 1960's and 70's, songs and movies about truck driving were major hits. Finding solidarity, truck drivers participated in widespread strikes. Truck drivers from all over opposed the rising cost of fuel. Not to mention this is during the energy crises of 1873 and 1979. In 1980 the Motor Carrier Act drastically deregulated the trucking industry. Since then trucking has come to dominate the freight industry in the latter part of the 20th century. This coincided with what are now known as 'big-box' stores such as Target or Wal-Mart.

In the United States, the term 'full trailer' is used for a freight trailer supported by front and rear axles and pulled by a drawbar. This term is slightly different in Europe, where a full trailer is known as an A-frame drawbar trail. A full trailer is 96 or 102 in (2.4 or 2.6 m) wide and 35 or 40 ft (11 or 12 m) long.

There are certain characteristics of a truck that makes it an "off-road truck". They generally standard, extra heavy-duty highway-legal trucks. Although legal, they have off-road features like front driving axle and special tires for applying it to tasks such as logging and construction. The purpose-built off-road vehicles are unconstrained by weighing limits, such as the Libherr T 282B mining truck.

The American Trucking Associations initiated in 1985 with the intent to improve the industry's image. With public opinion declining the association tried numerous moves. One such move was changing the name of the "National Truck Rodeo" to the "National Driving Championship". This was due to the fact that the word rodeo seemed to imply recklessness and reckless driving.

The interstate moving industry in the United States maintains regulation by the FMCSA, which is part of the USDOT. With only a small staff (fewer than 20 people) available to patrol hundreds of moving companies, enforcement is difficult. As a result of such a small staff, there are in many cases, no regulations that qualify moving companies as 'reliable'. Without this guarantee, it is difficult to a consumer to make a choice. Although, moving companies can provide and often display a DOT license.

Popular among campers is the use of lightweight trailers, such as aerodynamic trailers. These can be towed by a small car, such as the BMW Air Camper. They are built with the intent to lower the tow of the vehicle, thus minimizing drag.

AMSA wanted to help consumers avoid untrustworthy or illegitimate movers. In January 2008, AMSA created the ProMover certification program for its members. As a member, you must have federal interstate operating authority. Members are also required to pass an annual criminal back check, be licensed by the FMCSA, and agree to abide by ethical standards. This would include honesty in advertising and in business transaction with customers. Each must also sign a contract committing to adhere to applicable Surface Transportation Board and FMCSA regulations. AMSA also takes into consideration and examines ownership. They are very strict, registration with state corporation commissions. This means that the mover must maintain at least a satisfactory rating with the Better Business Bureau (BBB). As one can imagine, those that pass are authorized to display the ProMove logo on the websites and in marketing materials. However, those that fail will be expelled from the program (and AMSA) if they cannot correct discrepancies during probation.

In some states, a business route is designated by adding the letter "B" after the number instead of placing a "Business" sign above it. For example, Arkansas signs US business route 71 as "US 71B". On some route shields and road signs, the word "business" is shortened to just "BUS". This abbreviation is rare and usually avoided to prevent confusion with bus routes.

Without strong land use controls, buildings are too often built in town right along a bypass. This results with the conversion of it into an ordinary town road, resulting in the bypass becoming as congested as the local streets. On the contrary, a bypass is intended to avoid such local street congestion. Gas stations, shopping centers, along with various other businesses are often built alongside them. They are built in hopes of easing accessibility, while home are ideally avoided for noise reasons.

Public transportation is vital to a large part of society and is in dire need of work and attention. In 2010, the DOT awarded $742.5 million in funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to 11 transit projects. The awardees specifically focused light rail projects. One includes both a commuter rail extension and a subway project in New York City. The public transportation New York City has to offer is in need of some TLC. Another is working on a rapid bus transit system in Springfield, Oregon. The funds also subsidize a heavy rail project in northern Virginia. This finally completes the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority's Metro Silver Line, connecting to Washington, D.C., and the Washington Dulles International Airport. This is important because the DOT has previously agreed to subsidize the Silver Line construction to Reston, Virginia.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is an agency within the United States Department of Transportation. The purpose of the FMCSA is to regulate safety within the trucking and moving industry in the United States. The FMCSA enforces safety precautions that reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities involving large trucks and buses.

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

The term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry. This is where the word is known to have been used in 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage) specifically a large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin. It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911. Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry" was used for a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issues Hours of Service regulations. At the same time, they govern the working hours of anyone operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in the United States. Such regulations apply to truck drivers, commercial and city bus drivers, and school bus drivers who operate CMVs. With these rules in place, the number of daily and weekly hours spent driving and working is limited. The FMCSA regulates the minimum amount of time drivers must spend resting between driving shifts. In regards to intrastate commerce, the respective state's regulations apply.

Throughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route most commonly used on an alternative routing of a highway around a town. Specifically when the main route of the highway goes through the town. Originally, these routes were designated as "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns. However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass". Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.

In today's popular culture, recreational vehicles struggle to find their own niche. Travel trailers or mobile home with limited living facilities, or where people can camp or stay have been referred to as trailers. Previously, many would refer to such vehicles as towable trailers.

Ultra light trucks are very easy to spot or acknowledge if you are paying attention. They are often produced variously such as golf cars, for instance, it has internal combustion or a battery electric drive. They usually for off-highway use on estates, golf courses, parks, in stores, or even someone in an electric wheelchair. While clearly not suitable for highway usage, some variations may be licensed as slow speed vehicles. The catch is that they may on operate on streets, usually a body variation of a neighborhood electric vehicle. A few manufacturers produce specialized chassis for this type of vehicle. Meanwhile, Zap Motors markets a version of the xebra electric tricycle. Which, believe it or not, is able to attain a general license in the United States as a motorcycle.

The industry intends to both consumers as well as moving companies, this is why there are Ministers of Transportation in the industry. They are there to set and maintain laws and regulations in place to create a safer environment. It offers its members professional service training and states the time that movers have been in existence. It also provides them with federal government representation and statistical industry reporting. Additionally, there are arbitration services for lost or damaged claims, publications, public relations, and annual tariff updates and awards. This site includes articles as well that give some direction, a quarterly data summary, and industry trends.

Heavy trucks. A cement mixer is an example of Class 8 heavy trucks. Heavy trucks are the largest on-road trucks, Class 8. These include vocational applications such as heavy dump trucks, concrete pump trucks, and refuse hauling, as well as ubiquitous long-haul 6×4 and 4x2 tractor units. Road damage and wear increase very rapidly with the axle weight. The axle weight is the truck weight divided by the number of axles, but the actual axle weight depends on the position of the load over the axles. The number of steering axles and the suspension type also influence the amount of the road wear. In many countries with good roads, a six-axle truck may have a maximum weight over 50 tons (49 long tons; 55 short tons).