San Bernardino Movers Top Rated

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51 Movers in San Bernardino

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LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Ben C.

We just hired Burgess Moving to relocate our office and they were awesome. The team was truly friendly, exceptionally cautious with our expensive office equipment and to very effective. I would hire them again.

United States California San Bernardino

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jordan W.

They moved our things so rapidly and made the day significantly less distressing! I would exceedingly prescribe them to make a generally tiring knowledge vastly improved.

United States California San Bernardino

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Derek T.

Superb occupation of wrapping and moving my furniture in a short measure of time. Between the drive and stacking and dropping off, it was a sum of 4 1/2 hours. I was truly awed and will prescribe them to companions and utilize them in the event that I move later on.

United States California San Bernardino

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Kristin W.

They were quick, effective, and everything was kept in one piece! They even disassembled my bed outline and reassembled upon entry. I will be utilizing them in the event that I ever move again!

United States California San Bernardino

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Mary C.

They showed up precisely on time and had us moved rapidly. They truly hustled however brought were still cautious with our things. The forthright estimating was decent and sensible.

United States California San Bernardino

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Eugen S.

Incredible experience - I would absolutely prescribe them! I called them just a couple of days before our turn and they fit us into their timetable and offered a decent cost and brilliant administration. They were on time, their evaluated time was spot on, and their staff were cordial, obliging and watchful with our stuff. I met the proprietor who made a trip to help for a bit, and learned they are a privately-owned company who truly need their clients to be glad. Everything was exceptionally proficient and this made our turn go well. I was extremely cheerful and I'll do a reversal next time I require something moved.

United States California San Bernardino

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Myles F.

Great client service! I connected with numerous individuals all through the procedure. Every one of them were exceptionally aware, inviting, responsive, and accommodating. I had an inclination that I was kept on the up and up at all focuses.

United States California San Bernardino

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Pan C.

I've utilized this organization twice. Both times the specialists were on time, speedy and effective. They are likewise exceptionally watchful with the furniture and will cover everything for you with plastic wrap if fundamental. The staff in the workplace is incredible at noting or hitting you up with answers to your inquiries. I plan to utilize them once more!

United States California San Bernardino

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Genesis A.

I moved Saturday from San Dimas to Rancho Cucamonga, Carlos and his team did an immaculate move, smooth and extremely proficient. The best part about this moving company is the value they give me before my turn, it was ensured. I didn't pay anything additional... I will prescribe your support of every one of my companions. Much obliged to you One Price Moving.

United States California San Bernardino

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Bernardino

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Bernardino

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Bernardino

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Bernardino

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Bernardino

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
user avatar

 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California San Bernardino
According to the United States Census Bureau , the city has a total area of 59.6 square miles (154 km 2 ), of which 59.2 square miles (153 km 2 ) is land and 0.4 square miles (1.0 km 2 ), or 0.74%, is water.
The city lies in the San Bernardino foothills and the eastern portion of the San Bernardino Valley , roughly 60 miles (97 km) east of Los Angeles. Some major geographical features of the city include the San Bernardino Mountains and the San Bernardino National Forest , in which the city's northernmost neighborhood, Arrowhead Springs, is located; the Cajon Pass adjacent to the northwest border; City Creek, Lytle Creek , San Timoteo Creek , Twin Creek, Warm Creek (as modified through flood control channels) feed the Santa Ana River , which forms part of the city's southern border south of San Bernardino International Airport .
San Bernardino is unique among Southern Californian cities because of its wealth of water, which is mostly contained in underground aquifers. A large part of the city is over the Bunker Hill Groundwater Basin, including downtown . This fact accounts for an historically high water table in portions of the city, including at the former Urbita Springs, a lake which no longer exists and is now the site of the Inland Center Mall. Seccombe Lake, named after a former mayor, is a manmade lake at Sierra Way and 5th Street. The San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District ("Muni") has plans to build two more large, multi-acre lakes north and south of historic downtown in order to reduce groundwater, mitigate the risks of liquefaction in a future earthquake, and sell the valuable water to neighboring agencies.
The city has several notable hills and mountains; among them are: Perris Hill (named after Fred Perris, an early engineer, and the namesake of Perris, California ); Kendall Hill (which is near California State University); and Little Mountain, which rises among Shandin Hills (generally bounded by Sierra Way, 30th Street, Kendall Drive, and Interstate 215 ).
Freeways act as significant geographical dividers for the city of San Bernardino. Interstate 215 is the major east-west divider, while State Route 210 is the major north-south divider. Interstate 10 is in the southern part of the city. Other major highways include State Route 206 (Kendall Drive and E Street); State Route 66 (which includes the former U.S. 66); State Route 18 (from State Route 210 north on Waterman Avenue to the northern City limits into the mountain communities), and State Route 259 , the freeway connector between State Route 210 and I-215.

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There are various versions of a moving scam, but it basically begins with a prospective client. Then the client starts to contact a moving company to request a cost estimate. In today's market, unfortunately, this often happens online or via phone calls. So essentially a customer is contacting them for a quote when the moving company may not have a license. These moving sales people are salesman prone to quoting sometimes low. Even though usually reasonable prices with no room for the movers to provide a quality service if it is a broker.

In the United States, the term 'full trailer' is used for a freight trailer supported by front and rear axles and pulled by a drawbar. This term is slightly different in Europe, where a full trailer is known as an A-frame drawbar trail. A full trailer is 96 or 102 in (2.4 or 2.6 m) wide and 35 or 40 ft (11 or 12 m) long.

As we've learned the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 was crucial in the construction of the Interstate Highway System. Described as an interconnected network of the controlled-access freeway. It also allowed larger trucks to travel at higher speeds through rural and urban areas alike. This act was also the first to allow the first federal largest gross vehicle weight limits for trucks, set at 73,208 pounds (33,207 kg). The very same year, Malcolm McLean pioneered modern containerized intermodal shipping. This allowed for the more efficient transfer of cargo between truck, train, and ships.

The Motor Carrier Act, passed by Congress in 1935, replace the code of competition. The authorization the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) place was to regulate the trucking industry. Since then the ICC has been long abolished, however, it did quite a lot during its time. Based on the recommendations given by the ICC, Congress enacted the first hours of services regulation in 1938. This limited driving hours of truck and bus drivers. In 1941, the ICC reported that inconsistent weight limitation imposed by the states cause problems to effective interstate truck commerce.

In 1976, the number one hit on the Billboard chart was "Convoy," a novelty song by C.W. McCall about a convoy of truck drivers evading speed traps and toll booths across America. The song inspired the 1978 action film Convoy directed by Sam Peckinpah. After the film's release, thousands of independent truck drivers went on strike and participated in violent protests during the 1979 energy crisis (although similar strikes had occurred during the 1973 energy crisis).

Trucks of the era mostly used two-cylinder engines and had a carrying capacity of 1,500 to 2,000 kilograms (3,300 to 4,400 lb). In 1904, 700 heavy trucks were built in the United States, 1000 in 1907, 6000 in 1910, and 25000 in 1914. A Benz truck modified by Netphener company (1895)

In the United States, a commercial driver's license is required to drive any type of commercial vehicle weighing 26,001 lb (11,794 kg) or more. In 2006 the US trucking industry employed 1.8 million drivers of heavy trucks.

There are certain characteristics of a truck that makes it an "off-road truck". They generally standard, extra heavy-duty highway-legal trucks. Although legal, they have off-road features like front driving axle and special tires for applying it to tasks such as logging and construction. The purpose-built off-road vehicles are unconstrained by weighing limits, such as the Libherr T 282B mining truck.

A semi-trailer is almost exactly what it sounds like, it is a trailer without a front axle. Proportionally, its weight is supported by two factors. The weight falls upon a road tractor or by a detachable front axle assembly, known as a dolly. Generally, a semi-trailer is equipped with legs, known in the industry as "landing gear". This means it can be lowered to support it when it is uncoupled. In the United States, a trailer may not exceed a length of 57 ft (17.37 m) on interstate highways. However, it is possible to link two smaller trailers together to reach a length of 63 ft (19.20 m).

Within the world of transportation, bypass routes are often very controversial. This is mostly due to the fact that they require the building of a road carrying heavy traffic where no road existed before. This has created conflict among society thus creating a divergence between those in support of bypasses and those who are opposed. Supporters believe they reduce congestion in built up areas. Those in opposition do not believe in developing (often rural) undeveloped land. In addition, the cities that are bypassed may also oppose such a project as reduced traffic may, in turn, reduce and damage business.

In the United States, the Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 established minimum requirements that must be met when a state issues a commercial driver's license CDL. It specifies the following types of license: - Class A CDL drivers. Drive vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater, or any combination of vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater when towing a trailer weighing more than 10,000 pounds. Transports quantities of hazardous materials that require warning placards under Department of Public Safety regulations. - Class A Driver License permits. Is a step in preparation for Class A drivers to become a Commercial Driver. - Class B CDL driver. Class B is designed to transport 16 or more passengers (including driver) or more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation. This includes, but is not limited to, tow trucks, tractor trailers, and buses.

The United States Department of Transportation has become a fundamental necessity in the moving industry. It is the pinnacle of the industry, creating and enforcing regulations for the sake of safety for both businesses and consumers alike. However, it is notable to appreciate the history of such a powerful department. The functions currently performed by the DOT were once enforced by the Secretary of Commerce for Transportation. In 1965, Najeeb Halaby, administrator of the Federal Aviation Adminstration (FAA), had an excellent suggestion. He spoke to the current President Lyndon B. Johnson, advising that transportation be elevated to a cabinet level position. He continued, suggesting that the FAA be folded or merged, if you will, into the DOT. Clearly, the President took to Halaby's fresh ideas regarding transportation, thus putting the DOT into place.

DOT officers of each state are generally in charge of the enforcement of the Hours of Service (HOS). These are sometimes checked when CMVs pass through weigh stations. Drivers found to be in violation of the HOS can be forced to stop driving for a certain period of time. This, in turn, may negatively affect the motor carrier's safety rating. Requests to change the HOS are a source of debate. Unfortunately, many surveys indicate drivers routinely get away with violating the HOS. Such facts have started yet another debate on whether motor carriers should be required to us EOBRs in their vehicles. Relying on paper-based log books does not always seem to enforce the HOS law put in place for the safety of everyone.

Full truckload carriers normally deliver a semi-trailer to a shipper who will fill the trailer with freight for one destination. Once the trailer is filled, the driver returns to the shipper to collect the required paperwork. Upon receiving the paperwork the driver will then leave with the trailer containing freight. Next, the driver will proceed to the consignee and deliver the freight him or herself. At times, a driver will transfer the trailer to another driver who will drive the freight the rest of the way. Full Truckload service (FTL) transit times are generally restricted by the driver's availability. This is according to Hours of Service regulations and distance. It is typically accepted that Full Truckload carriers will transport freight at an average rate of 47 miles per hour. This includes traffic jams, queues at intersections, other factors that influence transit time.  

Truckload shipping is the movement of large amounts of cargo. In general, they move amounts necessary to fill an entire semi-trailer or inter-modal container. A truckload carrier is a trucking company that generally contracts an entire trailer-load to a single customer. This is quite the opposite of a Less than Truckload (LTL) freight services. Less than Truckload shipping services generally mix freight from several customers in each trailer. An advantage Full Truckload shipping carriers have over Less than Truckload carrier services is that the freight isn't handled during the trip. Yet, in an LTL shipment, goods will generally be transported on several different trailers.

The decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed to dramatically increase popularity among trucker culture. Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck drivers are romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws. These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Information regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.

With the onset of trucking culture, truck drivers often became portrayed as protagonists in popular media. Author Shane Hamilton, who wrote "Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy", focuses on truck driving. He explores the history of trucking and while connecting it development in the trucking industry. It is important to note, as Hamilton discusses the trucking industry and how it helps the so-called big-box stores dominate the U.S. marketplace. Hamilton certainly takes an interesting perspective historically speaking.

The most basic purpose of a trailer jack is to lift the trailer to a height that allows the trailer to hitch or unhitch to and from the towing vehicle. Trailer jacks may also be used for the leveling of the trailer during storage. To list a few common types of trailer jacks are A-frame jacks, swivel jacks, and drop-leg jacks. Other trailers, such as horse trailers, have a built-in jack at the tongue for this purpose.

Ultra light trucks are very easy to spot or acknowledge if you are paying attention. They are often produced variously such as golf cars, for instance, it has internal combustion or a battery electric drive. They usually for off-highway use on estates, golf courses, parks, in stores, or even someone in an electric wheelchair. While clearly not suitable for highway usage, some variations may be licensed as slow speed vehicles. The catch is that they may on operate on streets, usually a body variation of a neighborhood electric vehicle. A few manufacturers produce specialized chassis for this type of vehicle. Meanwhile, Zap Motors markets a version of the xebra electric tricycle. Which, believe it or not, is able to attain a general license in the United States as a motorcycle.

The industry intends to both consumers as well as moving companies, this is why there are Ministers of Transportation in the industry. They are there to set and maintain laws and regulations in place to create a safer environment. It offers its members professional service training and states the time that movers have been in existence. It also provides them with federal government representation and statistical industry reporting. Additionally, there are arbitration services for lost or damaged claims, publications, public relations, and annual tariff updates and awards. This site includes articles as well that give some direction, a quarterly data summary, and industry trends.

There are various versions of a moving scam, but it basically begins with a prospective client. Then the client starts to contact a moving company to request a cost estimate. In today's market, unfortunately, this often happens online or via phone calls. So essentially a customer is contacting them for a quote when the moving company may not have a license. These moving sales people are salesman prone to quoting sometimes low. Even though usually reasonable prices with no room for the movers to provide a quality service if it is a broker.