One Price Moving

PUC # 190977
10950 Church St #1011
Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730
Rancho Cucamonga
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Additional Phone: (323) 350-0130
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Moving with One Price Moving

One Price Moving was made to offer something that nobody else can in the moving business a, One Price Move.
We realize that moving can be distressing and here and there you need to pay expenses that were never specified, pay twofold the evaluated cost, and you don't have the foggiest idea about your aggregate cost until after the move.
When you utilize One Price Moving you won't need to stress over any of these issues.

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Your One Price Moving Reviews

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I moved Saturday from San Dimas to Rancho Cucamonga, Carlos and his team did an immaculate move, smooth and extremely proficient. The best part about this moving company is the value they give me before my turn, it was ensured. I didn't pay anything additional... I will prescribe your support of every one of my companions. Much obliged to you One Price Moving.

Did You Know

QuestionAll cars must pass some sort of emission check, such as a smog check to ensure safety.Similarly, trucks are subject to noise emissionrequirement, which is emanating from the U.S. Noise Control Act. Thiswas intendedto protect the public from noise health side effects.The loud noise is due to the way trucks contributedisproportionatelyto roadway noise.This isprimarilydue to the elevated stacks and intense tire and aerodynamic noise characteristics.

QuestionA relatable reality t.v. show to the industry is the show Ice Road Truckers, which premiered season 3 on the History Channel in 2009. The show documents the lives of truck drivers working the scary Dalton Highway in Alaska. Following drivers as they compete to see which one of them can haul the most loads before the end of the season.It'll grab you with its mechanical problems that so many have experienced and as you watch them avoid the pitfalls of dangerous and icy roads!


In the United States, commercial truck classificationis fixed byeach vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8.Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty.The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks.Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS,formerlyknown as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

QuestionDOT officers of each state are generally in charge of the enforcement of the Hours of Service (HOS). These are sometimes checked when CMVs pass through weigh stations. Drivers found to be in violation of the HOS canbe forcedto stop driving for a certain period of time. This, in turn, maynegativelyaffect the motor carrier's safety rating. Requests to change the HOS are a source of debate. Unfortunately, many surveysindicatedriversroutinelyget away with violating the HOS.Such facts have started yet another debate on whether motor carriers shouldbe requiredto us EOBRs in their vehicles.Relying on paper-based log books does not always seem to enforce the HOS law put in place for the safety of everyone.

QuestionThe decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed todramaticallyincrease popularity among trucker culture.Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck driversare romanticizedas modern-day cowboys and outlaws.These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Informationregardingthe locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.