Portola Movers Top Rated

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15 Movers in Portola

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LAST REVIEW

4 5 1 Reviewed 4 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Teresa Garrity

Spartacus and Gerrod were wonderful doing my move. Very professional. Took a lot of care wrapping my furniture so no damage would happen. I was amazed at how they packed the truck to get all my things inside of it. I would definitely use them again and definitely recommend this company. They have the highest rating in my opinion.

United States California Portola

LAST REVIEW

3 5 1 Reviewed 3 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Joey Z

Horrible experience with this moving company! Movers did not show up on time and operator was not responsive! Ended up making changes to everything. Stay away from this company!

United States California Portola

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Elaine I.

I found ARTHUR V DOMBROWSKI JR to be extremely professional, courteous and willing to go the extra mile to please. I had to pack and move to storage many things from my home. Everything was packed with great care and moved into ARTHUR V DOMBROWSKI JR climate controlled storage facility. The price was very reasonable, and the storage fees are even more reasonable, roughly 1/3 the cost of those self-storage places. These are very warm and honest people and I feel very secure that my possessions are in the best of hands. I would never use anyone else for my moving and storage needs.

United States California Portola

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 2.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jeanette Oliver

Moved 3 things 7 miles and broke an old fashioned mirror. Declined to repair. messy and misused things.

United States California Portola

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Miranda K

Simply needed to say that you have an astonishing group. They were a considerable measure of fun and exceptionally productive. It was astounding to watch the yoga/ninja moves that were utilized to securely move the furniture into the house. I would prescribe your organization to my companions and collaborators.

United States California Portola

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Amanda D

These folks were extraordinary! We moved to Tahoe from the Bay and they did our empty. Two super neighborly, decent folks went ahead time and moved everything in rapidly and with consideration. I unquestionably prescribe them!

United States California Portola

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Lawrence B.

The fellas were comical and greatly accommodating. I don't wanna move again at any point in the near future however I will be utilizing them if and when.

United States California Portola

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - J M.

All that they said they would do they did. Value they cited was the value I paid. Movers on both finishes were amicable and proficient. I don't know how it shows signs of improvement than that.

United States California Portola

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Nancy R.

They are truly productive and get directly down to business when they arrive. Exceptionally proficient folks. They go over the agreement and answer any inquiries you might have before they start. They make a point to pack delicate furniture in covers and they shrivel wrap all furniture before they convey it to the truck. It's additionally so natural to book a meeting with them through their site. Reaction time is prompt. They are my go to folks for moving at this point.

United States California Portola

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jessie B.

They finished to work on time and without any issues. They were to a great degree simple to work with and extremely adaptable. I will prescribed them to anybody hoping to have help moving.

United States California Portola

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Mimi E.

The packers were unbelievably pleasant and watchful. Similar to the movers - by the end, I felt like they were our amigos who helped us move! :D And the expense was more than reasonable for such stunning service.

United States California Portola

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Wendy A.

Nothing was harmed at all amid the move, and I wound up with more stuff to move than I'd initially reported, yet the movers didn't appear to mind. They worked rapidly and effectively to stack and empty everything. Nothing awful to report, only all great. Extraordinary occupation!

United States California Portola

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - David P.

C&J Moving are stunning! I called at the beginning of today on a long-shot to check whether they could move 3 expansive, substantial things this evening and was inquired as to whether 4 pm would be OK. They arrived comfortable and made an amazing showing (with a great price).

United States California Portola

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Peter Q.

These folks are extraordinary! They truly helped us to get everything into our new home in a matter of moments. Furthermore, they made it super simple. We would and will utilize them again for any moving we may do later on!

United States California Portola

LAST REVIEW

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 - Moving Authority

Congratulations of you becoming compliant with arbitration.

United States California Portola

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As we've learned the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 was crucial in the construction of the Interstate Highway System. Described as an interconnected network of the controlled-access freeway. It also allowed larger trucks to travel at higher speeds through rural and urban areas alike. This act was also the first to allow the first federal largest gross vehicle weight limits for trucks, set at 73,208 pounds (33,207 kg). The very same year, Malcolm McLean pioneered modern containerized intermodal shipping. This allowed for the more efficient transfer of cargo between truck, train, and ships.

Prior to the 20th century, freight was generally transported overland via trains and railroads. During this time, trains were essential, and they were highly efficient at moving large amounts of freight. But, they could only deliver that freight to urban centers for distribution by horse-drawn transport. Though there were several trucks throughout this time, they were used more as space for advertising that for actual utility. At this time, the use of range for trucks was quite challenging. The use of electric engines, lack of paved rural roads, and small load capacities limited trucks to most short-haul urban routes.

As we've learned the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 was crucial in the construction of the Interstate Highway System. Described as an interconnected network of the controlled-access freeway. It also allowed larger trucks to travel at higher speeds through rural and urban areas alike. This act was also the first to allow the first federal largest gross vehicle weight limits for trucks, set at 73,208 pounds (33,207 kg). The very same year, Malcolm McLean pioneered modern containerized intermodal shipping. This allowed for the more efficient transfer of cargo between truck, train, and ships.

In 1978 Sylvester Stallone starred in the film "F.I.S.T.". The story is loosely based on the 'Teamsters Union'. This union is a labor union which includes truck drivers as well as its then president, Jimmy Hoffa.

The year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck". While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as far as to say "motor-powered load carrier".

AMSA wanted to help consumers avoid untrustworthy or illegitimate movers. In January 2008, AMSA created the ProMover certification program for its members. As a member, you must have federal interstate operating authority. Members are also required to pass an annual criminal back check, be licensed by the FMCSA, and agree to abide by ethical standards. This would include honesty in advertising and in business transaction with customers. Each must also sign a contract committing to adhere to applicable Surface Transportation Board and FMCSA regulations. AMSA also takes into consideration and examines ownership. They are very strict, registration with state corporation commissions. This means that the mover must maintain at least a satisfactory rating with the Better Business Bureau (BBB). As one can imagine, those that pass are authorized to display the ProMove logo on the websites and in marketing materials. However, those that fail will be expelled from the program (and AMSA) if they cannot correct discrepancies during probation.

In some states, a business route is designated by adding the letter "B" after the number instead of placing a "Business" sign above it. For example, Arkansas signs US business route 71 as "US 71B". On some route shields and road signs, the word "business" is shortened to just "BUS". This abbreviation is rare and usually avoided to prevent confusion with bus routes.

A relatable reality t.v. show to the industry is the show Ice Road Truckers, which premiered season 3 on the History Channel in 2009. The show documents the lives of truck drivers working the scary Dalton Highway in Alaska. Following drivers as they compete to see which one of them can haul the most loads before the end of the season. It'll grab you with its mechanical problems that so many have experienced and as you watch them avoid the pitfalls of dangerous and icy roads!

In the United States, the Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 established minimum requirements that must be met when a state issues a commercial driver's license CDL. It specifies the following types of license: - Class A CDL drivers. Drive vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater, or any combination of vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater when towing a trailer weighing more than 10,000 pounds. Transports quantities of hazardous materials that require warning placards under Department of Public Safety regulations. - Class A Driver License permits. Is a step in preparation for Class A drivers to become a Commercial Driver. - Class B CDL driver. Class B is designed to transport 16 or more passengers (including driver) or more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation. This includes, but is not limited to, tow trucks, tractor trailers, and buses.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is an agency within the United States Department of Transportation. The purpose of the FMCSA is to regulate safety within the trucking and moving industry in the United States. The FMCSA enforces safety precautions that reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities involving large trucks and buses.

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

The term "lorry" has an ambiguous origin, but it is likely that its roots were in the rail transport industry. This is where the word is known to have been used in 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage) specifically a large flat wagon. It may derive from the verb lurry, which means to pull or tug, of uncertain origin. It's expanded meaning was much more exciting as "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods", and has been in usage since 1911. Previously, unbeknownst to most, the word "lorry" was used for a fashion of big horse-drawn goods wagon.

Logistics is generally the ability to organize and put in place many complex operations at a single time. It is the management of the flow of things to meet the needs of customers or corporations. Resources managed in logistics includes tangible items such as food, materials, animals, equipment, etc. Not to mention the items that are not tangible such as time and information. This means that the movement of physical items, such as in the moving industry, involves a clear understanding of solid workflow. Such logistics can involve the handling of necessary materials, producing, packaging, inventory, transportation, warehousing, and often security.

The 1980s were full of happening things, but in 1982 a Southern California truck driver gained short-lived fame. His name was Larry Walters, also known as "Lawn Chair Larry", for pulling a crazy stunt. He ascended to a height of 16,000 feet (4,900 m) by attaching helium balloons to a lawn chair, hence the name. Walters claims he only intended to remain floating near the ground and was shocked when his chair shot up at a rate of 1,000 feet (300 m) per minute. The inspiration for such a stunt Walters claims his poor eyesight for ruining his dreams to become an Air Force pilot.

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry. There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine. Improvement in transmissions is yet another source, just like the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.   The first state weight limits for trucks were determined and put in place in 1913. Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads. As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and a maximum speed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks to mostly urban areas.

The decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed to dramatically increase popularity among trucker culture. Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck drivers are romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws. These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Information regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) conducted a series of tests. These tests were extensive field tests of roads and bridges to assess damages to the pavement. In particular they wanted to know how traffic contributes to the deterioration of pavement materials. These tests essentially led to the 1964 recommendation by AASHTO to Congress. The recommendation determined the gross weight limit for trucks to be determined by a bridge formula table. This includes table based on axle lengths, instead of a state upper limit. By the time 1970 came around, there were over 18 million truck on America's roads.