All American Transfer

USDOT # 2716011
5532 Bellingham Way
Orangevale, CA 95662
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Additional Phone: (916) 425-6892
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Mayflower, with the direction of Mike Par in Lake Charles, is a triumphant mix! From moving things around your home, to pressing administrations with moving the nation over, Mike and his staff will guarantee that your desires are being met.

All American Transfer and Storage were awesome. They were exact in their evaluation and our turn went off effortlessly. I for the most part preferred the capacity to meet at their distribution center in Lafayette for help in strolling me through the procedure. I would suggest calling Christina, she will deal with you as she did me!

Did You Know

QuestionIn 1971, author and director Steven Spielberg, debuted his first feature length film. His made-for-tv film, Duel, portrayed a truck driver as an anonymous stalker.Apparentlythere seems to be a trend in the 70's tonegativelystigmatize truck drivers.

QuestionIn 1893, the Office of Road Inquiry (ORI)was establishedas an organization.However, in 1905 the namewas changedto the Office Public Records (OPR).The organization then went on to become a division of the United States Department of Agriculture. As seen throughout history, organizations seem incapable of maintaining permanent names.So, the organization's namewas changedthree more times, first in 1915 to the Bureau of Public Roads and again in 1939 to the Public Roads Administration (PRA). Yet again, the name was later shifted to the Federal Works Agency, although itwas abolishedin 1949.Finally, in 1949, the name reverted to the Bureau of Public Roads, falling under the Department of Commerce. With so many name changes, it can be difficult to keep up to date with such organizations. This is why it is most important to research and educate yourself on such matters.

QuestionThroughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route mostcommonlyused on an alternative routing of a highway around a town.Specificallywhen the main route of the highway goes through the town.Originally, these routeswere designatedas "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns.However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass".Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.

QuestionThe decade of the 70's in the United States was a memorable one, especially for the notion of truck driving. This seemed todramaticallyincrease popularity among trucker culture.Throughout this era, and even in today's society, truck driversare romanticizedas modern-day cowboys and outlaws.These stereotypes were due to their use of Citizens Band (CB) radios to swap information with other drivers. Informationregardingthe locations of police officers and transportation authorities. The general public took an interest in the truckers 'way of life' as well. Both drivers and the public took interest in plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and CB slang.


The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry.There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine.Improvement in transmissions is yet another source,justlike the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.
The first state weight limits for truckswere determinedand put in place in 1913.Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads.As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and amaximumspeed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks tomostlyurban areas.