Inglewood Movers Top Rated

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489 Movers in Inglewood

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LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Ryan L

Burbank Movers were astounding! They landed toward the start of the 2 hour entry estimation they gave me. They were so watchful with all my furniture and ensured nothing was harmed in the move. The were unbelievably quick, and made the entire experience push free for me. I would exceptionally prescribe utilizing Burbank Movers!! Amdy and Liz were exceptionally expert and decent. I will totally request them later on! Much appreciated Burbank Movers!

United States California Inglewood

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Deven D

Simply moved today and they were immediate, super quick, and superb movers! Great correspondence and astounding working with the team on an assessment.

United States California Inglewood

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Tammy L

The truck touched base on time and was all the more then sufficient for the measure of stuff being moved. Cautious however productive treatment of all things. I will call them whenever I need to move.

United States California Inglewood

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Tatiana T

Super amicable and productive! The folks brought my washer/dryer to my home and uninstalled and moved the old one out for me. I will ring them again when I have to move overwhelming furniture! Much obliged! :)

United States California Inglewood

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Erin T

Exceptionally proficient, persevering group. Took awesome consideration of my belonging, and took after guidelines with practically zero supervision required. Worked quick, and aggressively valued contrasted with different organizations.

United States California Inglewood

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Badral T

Used them again today to move my office stuff. Got a same deal, same team, same good service!!! They came on time did a professional job. So glad that i found a profesional affordable moving company in Los Angeles.

United States California Inglewood

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Lena T

I utilized this organization to move all my stuff, and I have a great deal!. They were sorted out, proficient and well disposed. Effective and dealt with my assets. I at long last found a moving organization that is amazingly moderate, fair, and persevering. I am going to utilize this organization once more! Much obliged to you at the end of the day for such a stunning employment well done!

United States California Inglewood

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Alan A

These folks were decent, cool, simple to manage and above all patient. Furthermore reasonable! I would utilize them once more.

United States California Inglewood

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Brianna T

So quick and expert. They moved everything rapidly and were so decent and supportive. Completed in precisely three hours and didn't charge any shrouded expenses. Very prescribe.

United States California Inglewood

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Sal B

Would exceptionally prescribe, they were stunning. They wrapped all my furniture in covers, and took care of everything with consideration. Originating from an exceptionally particular individual, this is high acclaim.

United States California Inglewood

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Donald P

Other than losing the parts for my bed, scratching the front face of the dresser; neglecting to stack my work area and seat; everything else was fine. Everything they could say was "record a case with the cases division". Be exceptionally watchful of their quotes. They were sufficiently decent not to charge me the additional 3% Mastercard expense (they never said there would be an additional charge). Who might have imagined that by transporting more, it would cost less (I dont mean the expense per pound either). In the event that I transported 2000 lbs. it would have taken a toll $300 not exactly the genuine weight that was 1820 lbs. Perhaps this is ordinary in the business however how regularly would a client question that?

United States California Inglewood

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 1.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Ant

Man I wish I could give these guys 0 stars. 1st of all be very careful with the estimate. I am not a mover I have no idea how to estimate cubic footage, if you are relying on them to help you figure it out, dont do it. I was estimated $4000, I ended up paying $8000. If you are moving from Mainland to Hawaii; take the money you will pay these guys and just go buy brand new stuff in Hawaii, and spend $500 shipping the important stuff. You can ship a car through Matson directly for only a few dollars more. If you go with these crooks you will pay thousands of dollars and maybe see your stuff again. 2nd, look at the responses they have been putting on the bad reviews here. They find excuses quoting fine print, or make it sound like you are confusing the companies! (really!?) This will give you a preview of the type of customer service you can expect from them. We have been waiting months for our stuff and everytime I follow up they have told me to wait 2 more weeks. Customer service is horrible. They will say nice things to you because you have so many moving options. But once they have your stuff and your money they will take their time and not communicate with you unless you contact first. They took my stuff and my money on June 21 and I am sitting in an empty house in Hawaii Mid Aug. Last week they told me end of Aug, and they are now telling me I have to wait till at least mid Sept. (UPDATE, Sept 17th: Guess what!? Mid Sept has come and gone and what did they say: Another 2 weeks!) They will keep saying that contractually they have to say 45-60 business days but it will come faster. That was why I chose them, but it looks like they are going to use every day of those 3 months. If they told us it was going to take 3 months from the beginning, I would not have chosen them. If you can wait months for your things, have tons of money, and dont care about customer service, these guys are the ones for you. Will update this review once I get my things, I just wanted to leave this here to hopefully save one poor soul from going with these guys.

United States California Inglewood

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - David

Wonderful company and employees! Julie was very nice and the movers made my move enjoyable. Nothing broke and I'm glad I choose Meest Moving!

United States California Inglewood

LAST REVIEW

2 5 1 Reviewed 2 times, 3.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - James Beelman

BEWARE OF A SCAM COMPANY!!!!! Do not hire this moving company they do SCAMS, they will quote you on a low rate pickup your stuff and will hold it hostage till you pay their hidden fees, if you request to see the breakdown of the charges they will put you on hold for hours till you give up and hang up. If you need to move i bet/hope/beleive that are better honest companies the Door to door van lines which is a sister company of Logistic Agent and their DOT is 2384411

United States California Inglewood

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Smita A.

Everything was moved in flawless condition and they took incredible consideration to wrap my substantial closet and move it up two precarious flights of stairs. Very suggest!

United States California Inglewood

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The American Moving & Storage Association (AMSA) is a non-profit trade association. AMSA represents members of the professional moving industry primarily based in the United States. The association consists of approximately 4,000 members. They consist of van lines, their agents, independent movers, forwarders, and industry suppliers. However, AMSA does not represent the self-storage industry.

Receiving nation attention during the 1960's and 70's, songs and movies about truck driving were major hits. Finding solidarity, truck drivers participated in widespread strikes. Truck drivers from all over opposed the rising cost of fuel. Not to mention this is during the energy crises of 1873 and 1979. In 1980 the Motor Carrier Act drastically deregulated the trucking industry. Since then trucking has come to dominate the freight industry in the latter part of the 20th century. This coincided with what are now known as 'big-box' stores such as Target or Wal-Mart.

Alongside the many different trailers provided are motorcycle trailers. They are designed to haul motorcycles behind an automobile or truck. Depending on size and capability, some trailer may be able to carry several motorcycles or perhaps just one. They specifically designed this trailer to meet the needs of motorcyclists. They carry motorcycles, have ramps, and include tie-downs. There may be a utility trailer adapted permanently or occasionally to haul one or more motorcycles.

A commercial driver's license (CDL) is a driver's license required to operate large or heavy vehicles.

The decade of the 70s saw the heyday of truck driving, and the dramatic rise in the popularity of "trucker culture". Truck drivers were romanticized as modern-day cowboys and outlaws (and this stereotype persists even today). This was due in part to their use of citizens' band (CB) radio to relay information to each other regarding the locations of police officers and transportation authorities. Plaid shirts, trucker hats, CB radios, and using CB slang were popular not just with drivers but among the general public.

In 1971, author and director Steven Spielberg, debuted his first feature length film. His made-for-tv film, Duel, portrayed a truck driver as an anonymous stalker. Apparently there seems to be a trend in the 70's to negatively stigmatize truck drivers.

The Federal Bridge Law handles relations between the gross weight of the truck, the number of axles, and the spacing between them. This is how they determine is the truck can be on the Interstate Highway system. Each state gets to decide the maximum, under the Federal Bridge Law. They determine by vehicle in combination with axle weight on state and local roads

The interstate moving industry in the United States maintains regulation by the FMCSA, which is part of the USDOT. With only a small staff (fewer than 20 people) available to patrol hundreds of moving companies, enforcement is difficult. As a result of such a small staff, there are in many cases, no regulations that qualify moving companies as 'reliable'. Without this guarantee, it is difficult to a consumer to make a choice. Although, moving companies can provide and often display a DOT license.

As we know in the trucking industry, some trailers are part of large trucks, which we call semi-trailer trucks for transportation of cargo. Trailers may also be used in a personal manner as well, whether for personal or small business purposes.

AMSA wanted to help consumers avoid untrustworthy or illegitimate movers. In January 2008, AMSA created the ProMover certification program for its members. As a member, you must have federal interstate operating authority. Members are also required to pass an annual criminal back check, be licensed by the FMCSA, and agree to abide by ethical standards. This would include honesty in advertising and in business transaction with customers. Each must also sign a contract committing to adhere to applicable Surface Transportation Board and FMCSA regulations. AMSA also takes into consideration and examines ownership. They are very strict, registration with state corporation commissions. This means that the mover must maintain at least a satisfactory rating with the Better Business Bureau (BBB). As one can imagine, those that pass are authorized to display the ProMove logo on the websites and in marketing materials. However, those that fail will be expelled from the program (and AMSA) if they cannot correct discrepancies during probation.

The United States' Interstate Highway System is full of bypasses and loops with the designation of a three-digit number. Usually beginning with an even digit, it is important to note that this pattern is highly inconsistent. For example, in Des Moines, Iowa the genuine bypass is the main route. More specifically, it is Interstate 35 and Interstate 80, with the loop into downtown Des Moines being Interstate 235. As it is illustrated in this example, they do not always consistently begin with an even number. However, the 'correct' designation is exemplified in Omaha, Nebraska. In Omaha, Interstate 480 traverses the downtown area, which is bypassed by Interstate 80, Interstate 680, and Interstate 95. Interstate 95 then in turn goes through Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Furthermore, Interstate 295 is the bypass around Philadelphia, which leads into New Jersey. Although this can all be rather confusing, it is most important to understand the Interstate Highway System and the role bypasses play.

The United States Department of Transportation has become a fundamental necessity in the moving industry. It is the pinnacle of the industry, creating and enforcing regulations for the sake of safety for both businesses and consumers alike. However, it is notable to appreciate the history of such a powerful department. The functions currently performed by the DOT were once enforced by the Secretary of Commerce for Transportation. In 1965, Najeeb Halaby, administrator of the Federal Aviation Adminstration (FAA), had an excellent suggestion. He spoke to the current President Lyndon B. Johnson, advising that transportation be elevated to a cabinet level position. He continued, suggesting that the FAA be folded or merged, if you will, into the DOT. Clearly, the President took to Halaby's fresh ideas regarding transportation, thus putting the DOT into place.

As of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) was established as its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999". The FMCSA is based in Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia. Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is an agency within the United States Department of Transportation. The purpose of the FMCSA is to regulate safety within the trucking and moving industry in the United States. The FMCSA enforces safety precautions that reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities involving large trucks and buses.

There are many different types of trailers that are designed to haul livestock, such as cattle or horses. Most commonly used are the stock trailer, which is enclosed on the bottom but has openings at approximately. This opening is at the eye level of the animals in order to allow ventilation. A horse trailer is a much more elaborate form of stock trailer. Generally horses are hauled with the purpose of attending or participating in competition. Due to this, they must be in peak physical condition, so horse trailers are designed for the comfort and safety of the animals. They're typically well-ventilated with windows and vents along with specifically designed suspension. Additionally, horse trailers have internal partitions that assist animals staying upright during travel. It's also to protect other horses from injuring each other in transit. There are also larger horse trailers that may incorporate more specialized areas for horse tack. They may even include elaborate quarters with sleeping areas, bathroom, cooking facilities etc.

In 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.

A Ministry of Transport (or) Transportation is responsible for transportation within a country. Administration usually falls upon the Minister for Transport. The term may also be applied to the departments or other government agencies administering transport in a nation who do not use ministers. There are various and vast responsibilities for agencies to oversee such as road safety. Others may include civil aviation, maritime transport, rail transport and so on. They continue to develop government transportation policy and organize public transit. All while trying to maintain and construct infrastructural projects. Some ministries have additional responsibilities in related policy areas as mentioned above.

Driver's licensing has coincided throughout the European Union in order to for the complex rules to all member states. Driving a vehicle weighing more than 7.5 tons (16,535 lb) for commercial purposes requires a certain license. This specialist licence type varies depending on the use of the vehicle and number of seat. Licences first acquired after 1997, the weight was reduced to 3,500 kilograms (7,716 lb), not including trailers.

Heavy trucks. A cement mixer is an example of Class 8 heavy trucks. Heavy trucks are the largest on-road trucks, Class 8. These include vocational applications such as heavy dump trucks, concrete pump trucks, and refuse hauling, as well as ubiquitous long-haul 6×4 and 4x2 tractor units. Road damage and wear increase very rapidly with the axle weight. The axle weight is the truck weight divided by the number of axles, but the actual axle weight depends on the position of the load over the axles. The number of steering axles and the suspension type also influence the amount of the road wear. In many countries with good roads, a six-axle truck may have a maximum weight over 50 tons (49 long tons; 55 short tons).