Huntington Beach Movers Top Rated

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148 Movers in Huntington Beach

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Shu W

Fantastic move done by Al and Richard. I felt they were so dedicated, cheerful and proficient. They never whined at ALL when the move itself was troublesome. They were tolerant. Thank you for making this the best move ever! I was so agonized over this move however they made it smooth. I would def suggest them and requestAl and Richard.

United States California Huntington Beach

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Adam S.

Move was completely effortless. They made an incredible showing offering me some assistance with finishing up pressing and securing all the furniture. Imbecilic ikea furniture didn't completely fit down steps so they even aided somewhat dismantle and set up back together! Would prescribe.

United States California Huntington Beach

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jane K.

They were quick, watchful and proficient all through the whole moving procedure. I would ask for them if I have to move once more.

United States California Huntington Beach

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - May R.

They needed to fight with insane development and road terminations simply getting on our road so bravo for exploring that single-handedly. At that point stairs at our old spot and stairs at the new place, whew! Super amicable,

United States California Huntington Beach

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Frank O.

They met our capacity holder at the distribution center, unloaded it, repacked it, and conveyed in impeccable condition. We were awed with how quick the administration was. They even experienced the inconvenience of reviewing our furniture when they unloaded the unit and let us recognize what the harm was. Much obliged to you B&C Movers.

United States California Huntington Beach

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Michelle Q.

They wrapped everything (in covers for transport) and let us use closet boxes. They actually unloaded the truck to our new house in a 30 minutes. Every one of the crates were in the right rooms, furniture went where educated and they were only ALL SO NICE! Just talking endlessly with us (as they are working their butts off, I may include) I would utilize these folks a million times over... Apollo Movers are marvelous!

United States California Huntington Beach

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Mitch S.

These folks are extraordinary! They made a great showing in my last move a year prior and simply agreed to another move one month from now. They are spotless, additional watchful not to harm the dividers, and brought the greater part of the additional pressing materials and covers and closet boxes. Very suggested! Incredible costs!

United States California Huntington Beach

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jessica A.

The movers appeared on time the day of the move and were likewise exceptionally aware and proficient. They took longer than cited, however the first gauge was respected. I had stand out little broken piece, yet they assumed liability, apologized, and had it supplanted inside of hours of finishing the move! Extremely inspired with the polished skill and client service of this company.

United States California Huntington Beach

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Maria R.

They are dependable, clean, polite and just plain great. I wouldn't look any further and I wouldn't say that if I didn't really mean it. Thank you all so very much.

United States California Huntington Beach

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Janice Q.

They went the additional mile again and again while they helped us move lofts. I'd suggest them for any employment, and will contract them once more.

United States California Huntington Beach

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Leonard C.

They were to a great degree cordial and supportive. They lost one easily overlooked detail (that I discovered not long after they cleared out) and were really distressed about it and gave me the directions on the best way to handle things in the event that it did stay lost - they stayed responsible and proficient all through the whole process.

United States California Huntington Beach

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Genesis O.

These folks were proficient - dealt with our stuff and never enjoyed even a reprieve. I was outrageously awed - we will utilize them next time without a doubt. Bed collected effectively back - and again dealt with our stuff as though it was theirs.

United States California Huntington Beach

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Bailey D.

They treat your assets deliberately and the move was perfect. The folks were exceptionally pleasant to associate with, they weren't even cantankerous following 3.5 hours! I will run with them again for my best course of action.

United States California Huntington Beach

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Denice W.

The entire experience was about as simple as moving can be. Incredible hustle, and super charming to work with.

United States California Huntington Beach

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Stan B.

They took incredible consideration of my stuff and were experts through and through. I very suggest these folks, the costs are reasonable and best of all the service is phenomenal.

United States California Huntington Beach
According to the United States Census Bureau , the city has a total area of 31.9 square miles (82.6 km 2 ). 26.7 sq mi (69 km 2 ) of it is land and 5.1 sq mi (13 km 2 ) of it (16.10%) is water.
The entire city of Huntington Beach lies in area codes 657 and 714 , except for small parts of Huntington Harbour (along with Sunset Beach, the community adjacent to Huntington Harbour), which is in the 562 Area Code .

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Driver's licensing has coincided throughout the European Union in order to for the complex rules to all member states. Driving a vehicle weighing more than 7.5 tons (16,535 lb) for commercial purposes requires a certain license. This specialist licence type varies depending on the use of the vehicle and number of seat. Licences first acquired after 1997, the weight was reduced to 3,500 kilograms (7,716 lb), not including trailers.

In the United States, the term 'full trailer' is used for a freight trailer supported by front and rear axles and pulled by a drawbar. This term is slightly different in Europe, where a full trailer is known as an A-frame drawbar trail. A full trailer is 96 or 102 in (2.4 or 2.6 m) wide and 35 or 40 ft (11 or 12 m) long.

“Country music scholar Bill Malone has gone so far as to say that trucking songs account for the largest component of work songs in the country music catalog. For a style of music that has, since its commercial inception in the 1920s, drawn attention to the coal man, the steel drivin’ man, the railroad worker, and the cowboy, this certainly speaks volumes about the cultural attraction of the trucker in the American popular consciousness.” — Shane Hamilton

In 1999, The Simpsons episode Maximum Homerdrive aired. It featured Homer and Bart making a delivery for a truck driver named Red after he unexpectedly dies of 'food poisoning'.

Very light trucks. Popular in Europe and Asia, many mini-trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles, usually with monocoque bodies. Specialized designs with substantial frames such as the Italian Piaggio shown here are based upon Japanese designs (in this case by Daihatsu) and are popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities that often have very narrow alleyways. Regardless of the name, these small trucks serve a wide range of uses. In Japan, they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break on taxes for buying a smaller and less-powerful vehicle (currently, the engine is limited to 660 ccs {0.66L} displacement). These vehicles are used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. These Japanese-made mini trucks that were manufactured for on-road use are competing with off-road ATVs in the United States, and import regulations require that these mini trucks have a 25 mph (40 km/h) speed governor as they are classified as low-speed vehicles. These vehicles have found uses in construction, large campuses (government, university, and industrial), agriculture, cattle ranches, amusement parks, and replacements for golf carts.Major mini truck manufacturers and their brands: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishi Minicab, Subaru Sambar, Suzuki Carry   As with many things in Europe and Asia, the illusion of delicacy and proper manners always seems to attract tourists. Popular in Europe and Asia, mini trucks are factory redesigns of light automobiles with monochrome bodies. Such specialized designs with such great frames such as the Italian Piaggio, based upon Japanese designs. In this case it was based upon Japanese designs made by Daihatsu. These are very popular for use in "old town" sections of European cities, which often have very narrow alleyways. Despite whatever name they are called, these very light trucks serve a wide variety of purposes.   Yet, in Japan they are regulated under the Kei car laws, which allow vehicle owners a break in taxes for buying a small and less-powerful vehicle. Currently, the engine is limited to 660 cc [0.66L] displacement. These vehicles began being used as on-road utility vehicles in Japan. Classified as a low speed vehicle, these Japanese-made mini trucks were manufactured for on-road use for competing the the off-road ATVs in the United States. Import regulations require that the mini trucks have a 25 mph (40km/h) speed governor. Again, this is because they are low speed vehicles.   However, these vehicles have found numerous amounts of ways to help the community. They invest money into the government, universities, amusement parks, and replacements for golf cars. They have some major Japanese mini truck manufacturarers as well as brands such as: Daihatsu Hijet, Honda Acty, Mazda Scrum, Mitsubishit Minicab, Subaru Sambar, and Suzuki Carry.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 40 million United States citizens have moved annually over the last decade. Of those people who have moved in the United States, 84.5% of them have moved within their own state, 12.5% have moved to another state, and 2.3% have moved to another country.

During the latter part of the 20th century, we saw a decline of the trucking culture. Coinciding with this decline was a decline of the image of truck drivers, as they became negatively stigmatized. As a result of such negativity, it makes sense that truck drivers were frequently portrayed as the "bad guy(s)" in movies.

A business route (occasionally city route) in the United States and Canada is a short special route connected to a parent numbered highway at its beginning, then routed through the central business district of a nearby city or town, and finally reconnecting with the same parent numbered highway again at its end.

Public transportation is vital to a large part of society and is in dire need of work and attention. In 2010, the DOT awarded $742.5 million in funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to 11 transit projects. The awardees specifically focused light rail projects. One includes both a commuter rail extension and a subway project in New York City. The public transportation New York City has to offer is in need of some TLC. Another is working on a rapid bus transit system in Springfield, Oregon. The funds also subsidize a heavy rail project in northern Virginia. This finally completes the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority's Metro Silver Line, connecting to Washington, D.C., and the Washington Dulles International Airport. This is important because the DOT has previously agreed to subsidize the Silver Line construction to Reston, Virginia.

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

The Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways is most commonly known as the Interstate Highway System, Interstate Freeway System, Interstate System, or simply the Interstate. It is a network of controlled-access highways that forms a part of the National Highway System of the United States. Named after President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who endorsed its formation, the idea was to have portable moving and storage. Construction was authorized by the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. The original portion was completed 35 years later, although some urban routes were canceled and never built. The network has since been extended and, as of 2013, it had a total length of 47,856 miles (77,017 km), making it the world's second longest after China's. As of 2013, about one-quarter of all vehicle miles driven in the country use the Interstate system. In 2006, the cost of construction had been estimated at about $425 billion (equivalent to $511 billion in 2015).

The main purpose of the HOS regulation is to prevent accidents due to driver fatigue. To do this, the number of driving hours per day, as well as the number of driving hours per week, have been limited. Another measure to prevent fatigue is to keep drivers on a 21 to 24-hour schedule in order to maintain a natural sleep/wake cycle. Drivers must take a daily minimum period of rest and are allowed longer "weekend" rest periods. This is in hopes to combat cumulative fatigue effects that accrue on a weekly basis.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issues Hours of Service regulations. At the same time, they govern the working hours of anyone operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) in the United States. Such regulations apply to truck drivers, commercial and city bus drivers, and school bus drivers who operate CMVs. With these rules in place, the number of daily and weekly hours spent driving and working is limited. The FMCSA regulates the minimum amount of time drivers must spend resting between driving shifts. In regards to intrastate commerce, the respective state's regulations apply.

Business routes generally follow the original routing of the numbered route through a city or town. Beginning in the 1930s and lasting thru the 1970s was an era marking a peak in large-scale highway construction in the United States. U.S. Highways and Interstates were typically built in particular phases. Their first phase of development began with the numbered route carrying traffic through the center of a city or town. The second phase involved the construction of bypasses around the central business districts of the towns they began. As bypass construction continued, original parts of routes that had once passed straight thru a city would often become a "business route".

The concept of a bypass is a simple one. It is a road or highway that purposely avoids or "bypasses" a built-up area, town, or village. Bypasses were created with the intent to let through traffic flow without having to get stuck in local traffic. In general they are supposed to reduce congestion in a built-up area. By doing so, road safety will greatly improve.   A bypass designated for trucks traveling a long distance, either commercial or otherwise, is called a truck route.

The 1950's were quite different than the years to come. They were more likely to be considered "Knights of the Road", if you will, for helping stranded travelers. In these times truck drivers were envied and were viewed as an opposition to the book "The Organization Man". Bestseller in 1956, author William H. Whyte's novel describes "the man in the gray flannel suit", who sat in an office every day. He's describing a typical office style job that is very structured with managers watching over everyone. Truck drivers represented the opposite of all these concepts. Popular trucking songs glorified the life of drivers as independent "wanderers". Yet, there were attempts to bring back the factory style efficiency, such as using tachnographs. Although most attempts resulted in little success. Drivers routinely sabotaged and discovered new ways to falsify the machine's records.

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry. There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine. Improvement in transmissions is yet another source, just like the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.   The first state weight limits for trucks were determined and put in place in 1913. Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads. As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and a maximum speed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks to mostly urban areas.

The term 'trailer' is commonly used interchangeably with that of a travel trailer or mobile home. There are varieties of trailers and manufactures housing designed for human habitation. Such origins can be found historically with utility trailers built in a similar fashion to horse-drawn wagons. A trailer park is an area where mobile homes are designated for people to live in.   In the United States, trailers ranging in size from single-axle dollies to 6-axle, 13 ft 6 in (4,115 mm) high, 53 ft (16,154 mm) in long semi-trailers is common. Although, when towed as part of a tractor-trailer or "18-wheeler", carries a large percentage of the freight. Specifically, the freight that travels over land in North America.

Words have always had a different meaning or have been used interchangeably with others across all cultures. In the United States, Canada, and the Philippines the word "truck" is mostly reserved for larger vehicles. Although in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, the word "truck" is generally reserved for large vehicles. In Australia and New Zealand, a pickup truck is usually called a ute, short for "utility". While over in South Africa it is called a bakkie (Afrikaans: "small open container"). The United Kingdom, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Ireland, and Hong Kong use the "lorry" instead of truck, but only for medium and heavy types.

Known as a truck in the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Puerto Rico, it is essentially a motor vehicle designed to transport cargo. Otherwise known as a lorry in the United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa, and Indian Subcontinent. Trucks vary not only in their types, but also in size, power, and configuration, the smallest being mechanically like an automobile. Commercial trucks may be very large and powerful, configured to mount specialized equipment. These are necessary in the case of fire trucks, concrete mixers, and suction excavators etc.