Meest Moving

500 East Harvard Street
Glendale, CA 91205
Contact Phone: 818 565 9721
Additional Phone: 323 872 9417
Company Site:

Moving with Meest Moving

If you need parcel delivery or parcels delivery,MeestMoving is here for your shipping needs. We also do office services delivery for our corporate customers. We do notsimplymail to the shipment address. Instead, we go all the way to make sure that parcels arrive in top condition. No two shipments are exactly alike, which is whyMeestMoving pays expert attention to detail. Don't believe us? Check out our reviews! Previous customers have enjoyed working with us, and have given us the feedback to prove it. Let us WOW you; chooseMeestMoving for your relocation needs.

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Your Meest Moving Reviews

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Wonderful company and employees! Julie was very nice and the movers made my move enjoyable. Nothing broke and I'm glad I choose Meest Moving!

Wonderful company and movers. Had a pleasant experience with my long distance move. Everyone was considerate and respectful. Will definitely use again. Thank you!!

Did You Know

QuestionThe United States Department of Transportation has become a fundamental necessity in the moving industry.It is the pinnacle of the industry, creating and enforcing regulations for the sake of safety for both businesses and consumers alike.However, it is notable to appreciate the history of such a powerful department.The functions currently performed by the DOT were once enforced by the Secretary of Commerce for Transportation.In 1965, Najeeb Halaby, administrator of the Federal Aviation Adminstration (FAA), had an excellent suggestion.He spoke to the current President Lyndon B. Johnson, advising that transportationbe elevatedto a cabinet level position. He continued, suggesting that the FAAbe foldedor merged, if you will, into the DOT.Clearly, the President took to Halaby's fresh ideasregardingtransportation, thus putting the DOT into place.

QuestionThere are many different types of trailers thatare designedto haul livestock, such as cattle or horses.Mostcommonlyused are the stock trailer, whichis enclosedon the bottom but has openings at approximately. This opening is at the eye level of the animalsin order toallow ventilation. A horse trailer is a much more elaborate form of stock trailer. Generally horsesare hauledwith the purpose of attending or participating in competition.Due to this, they must be in peak physical condition, so horse trailersare designedfor the comfort and safety of the animals. They'retypicallywell-ventilated with windows and vents along withspecificallydesigned suspension. Additionally, horse trailers have internal partitions that assist animals staying upright during travel. It's also to protect other horses from injuring each other in transit.There are also larger horse trailers that may incorporate more specialized areas for horse tack. They may even include elaborate quarters with sleeping areas, bathroom, cooking facilities etc.

QuestionBy the time 2006 came, there were over 26 million trucks on the United States roads, each hauling over 10 billion short tons of freight (9.1 billion long tons). This was representing almost 70% of the total volume of freight.When, as a driver or an automobile drivers, most automobile drivers arelargelyunfamiliar with large trucks.As as a result of these unaware truck drivers and their massive 18-wheeler'snumerousblind spots.The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has determined that 70% of fatal automobile/tractor trailer accident happen for a reason. That being the result of "unsafe actions of automobile drivers". People, as well as drivers, need to realize the dangers of such large trucks and pay more attention. Likewise for truck drivers as well.

QuestionIn 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.