Courtesy Moving and Storage

USDOT None
PUC # 191184
3515 N Sabre Dr
Fresno, CA 93727
Fresno
California
Contact Phone: (866) 662-1973
Additional Phone: (559) 352-0338
Company Site: www.courtesymoving.com

Moving with Courtesy Moving and Storage

Courtesy Moving & Storage has been around for more than forty years, and together, our staff members have more than 100 years of combined experience in the industry. That means that nearly all our movers have been perfecting their skills. They’ve spent that time learning the very best techniques and hands-on practices to ensure that Courtesy can provide unbeatable service to our customers during every project, every day.



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Your Courtesy Moving and Storage Reviews

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These folks are wonderful! Taken care of the move effortlessly and they took great consideration of our furniture. They came arranged and good to go. I loathe moving and these folks made it basic. Certainly was a decent choice to utilize their service! Much obliged

Did You Know

QuestionThe year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck".While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as faras tosay "motor-powered load carrier".

Question

In the United States, commercial truck classificationis fixed byeach vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8.Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty.The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks.Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS,formerlyknown as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).

Question

The Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula is a mathematical formula used in the United Statesto determine the appropriate gross weight for a long distance moving vehicle, based on the axle number and spacing. Enforced bythe Department of Transportation upon long-haul truck drivers, it is used as a means of preventing heavy vehicles from damaging roads and bridges.This is especially in particular to the total weight of a loaded truck, whetherbeing usedfor commercial moving services or for long distance moving services in general.
According to the Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula, the total weight of a loaded truck (tractor and trailer, 5-axle rig) cannot exceed 80,000 lbs in the United States.Under ordinary circumstances, long-haul equipment trucks will weight about 15,000 kg (33,069 lbs). This leaves about 20,000 kg (44,092 lbs) of freight capacity.Likewise, a loadis limitedto the space available in the trailer,normallywith dimensions of 48 ft (14.63 m) or 53 ft (16.15 m) long, 2.6 m (102.4 in) wide, 2.7 m (8 ft 10.3 in) high and 13 ft 6 in or 4.11 m high.

Question

The concept of a bypass is a simple one. It is a road or highway thatpurposelyavoids or "bypasses" a built-up area, town, or village.Bypasseswere createdwith the intent to let through traffic flow without having to get stuck in local traffic. In general theyare supposedto reduce congestion in a built-up area. By doing so, road safety willgreatlyimprove.
A bypass designated for trucks traveling a long distance, either commercial or otherwise,is calleda truck route.

QuestionIn 1933, as a part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal”, the National Recovery Administration requested that each industry creates a “code of fair competition”. The American Highway Freight Association and the Federated Trucking Associations of America met in the spring of 1933 to speak for the trucking association and begin discussing a code. By summer of 1933 the code of competition was completed and ready for approval. The two organizations had also merged to form the American Trucking Associations. The code was approved on February 10, 1934. On May 21, 1934, the first president of the ATA, Ted Rogers, became the first truck operator to sign the code. A special "Blue Eagle" license plate was created for truck operators to indicate compliance with the code.