El Cajon Movers Top Rated

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157 Movers in El Cajon

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Ed A.

Very fast and professional. Totally recommend these guys.

United States California El Cajon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Jenifer S.

They were opportune and took awesome consideration! They likewise dealt with their time shrewdly.

United States California El Cajon

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 4.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Roland H.

This is one of those times i felt constrained to compose an audit. These folks dealt with an exceptionally troublesome move from the top story of a split-level. Very recommended.Thanks folks.

United States California El Cajon

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1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Sarah C.

They showed up precisely on time and had us moved rapidly. They truly hustled yet brought were still watchful with our things. We utilized these movers on an individual proposal, and am glad to the point that we did. They were on time, brisk, watchful, and truly reasonable. It appeared like a pleasant family possessed business with the proprietor and his child as half of a four man team. They made it a low push move. forthright estimating was pleasant and sensible.

United States California El Cajon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Tisha W.

I as of late utilized Boyer Movers. They were amicable and proficient. They were incredible!!! I need to migrate and will be utilizing them once more.

United States California El Cajon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Faith A.

I prescribe them to anybody searching for movers. Their cost was sensible and they were willing to chip away at a very late move. I conversed with Robert who is the proprietor of the firm, he was extremely adaptable and exceptionally willing to suit to address our issues.

United States California El Cajon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Tania L.

Required help with an excitement focus move. Called at 9:30am, they arrived and done by 11am. Quick and expert.

United States California El Cajon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - James

Grate service

United States California El Cajon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Analisa S.

They do incredible work and remain by their service if anything doesn't go precisely to arrange. They're pricier however justified regardless of each and every penny.

United States California El Cajon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - James R.

I very suggest these folks. They are proficient and our turn was smooth the whole outing out of state. The folks were spotless and obliging. All went as guaranteed.

United States California El Cajon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Aljohn D.

I can't talk profoundly enough about this company Simple to work with all the way; exceedingly proficient; cordial; trustworthy; informative; tasteful; and moderate.

United States California El Cajon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Diana A.

What an incredible affair! On time, pleasant, sensible, dedicated, considerate, productive, watchful of our effects, extraordinary dispositions. Would utilize them again instant! Transformed a hard day into a simple one. Much obliged to you

United States California El Cajon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Mandi L.

It was an insignificant four days after the conception of our first child, so we knew there was potential for a great deal of anxiety and absurdity, however our new house was holding up.

United States California El Cajon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Sissy L.

Not just did everything go easily, with no harm and finish polished skill, yet they were quiet to the point that our daughter dozed through the entire thing!

United States California El Cajon

LAST REVIEW

1 5 1 Reviewed 1 times, 5.0 customer satisfaction.
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 - Willy M.

So content with my turn. Couldn't do it with them. Much obliged to you all for your quick legit solid and diligent work.

United States California El Cajon
El Cajon ( / ɛ l k ə ˈ h oʊ n / ; Spanish:  [elkaˈxon] ) is a city in San Diego County , California , United States . Nestled in a valley surrounded by mountains, the city has acquired the nickname of "The Big Box". Its name originated similarly, from the Spanish phrase "el cajón", which means "the box" or "the drawer."

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There are many different types of trailers that are designed to haul livestock, such as cattle or horses. Most commonly used are the stock trailer, which is enclosed on the bottom but has openings at approximately. This opening is at the eye level of the animals in order to allow ventilation. A horse trailer is a much more elaborate form of stock trailer. Generally horses are hauled with the purpose of attending or participating in competition. Due to this, they must be in peak physical condition, so horse trailers are designed for the comfort and safety of the animals. They're typically well-ventilated with windows and vents along with specifically designed suspension. Additionally, horse trailers have internal partitions that assist animals staying upright during travel. It's also to protect other horses from injuring each other in transit. There are also larger horse trailers that may incorporate more specialized areas for horse tack. They may even include elaborate quarters with sleeping areas, bathroom, cooking facilities etc.

“ The first original song about truck driving appeared in 1939 when Cliff Bruner and His Boys recorded Ted Daffan's "Truck Driver's Blues," a song explicitly marketed to roadside cafe owners who were installing juke boxes in record numbers to serve truckers and other motorists.” - Shane Hamilton

Another film released in 1975, White Line Fever, also involved truck drivers. It tells the story of a Vietnam War veteran who returns home to take over his father's trucking business. But, he soon finds that corrupt shippers are trying to force him to carry illegal contraband. While endorsing another negative connotation towards the trucking industry, it does portray truck drivers with a certain wanderlust.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 40 million United States citizens have moved annually over the last decade. Of those people who have moved in the United States, 84.5% of them have moved within their own state, 12.5% have moved to another state, and 2.3% have moved to another country.

In the United States, a commercial driver's license is required to drive any type of commercial vehicle weighing 26,001 lb (11,794 kg) or more. In 2006 the US trucking industry employed 1.8 million drivers of heavy trucks.

All cars must pass some sort of emission check, such as a smog check to ensure safety. Similarly, trucks are subject to noise emission requirement, which is emanating from the U.S. Noise Control Act. This was intended to protect the public from noise health side effects. The loud noise is due to the way trucks contribute disproportionately to roadway noise. This is primarily due to the elevated stacks and intense tire and aerodynamic noise characteristics.

A semi-trailer is almost exactly what it sounds like, it is a trailer without a front axle. Proportionally, its weight is supported by two factors. The weight falls upon a road tractor or by a detachable front axle assembly, known as a dolly. Generally, a semi-trailer is equipped with legs, known in the industry as "landing gear". This means it can be lowered to support it when it is uncoupled. In the United States, a trailer may not exceed a length of 57 ft (17.37 m) on interstate highways. However, it is possible to link two smaller trailers together to reach a length of 63 ft (19.20 m).

A business route (occasionally city route) in the United States and Canada is a short special route connected to a parent numbered highway at its beginning, then routed through the central business district of a nearby city or town, and finally reconnecting with the same parent numbered highway again at its end.

Without strong land use controls, buildings are too often built in town right along a bypass. This results with the conversion of it into an ordinary town road, resulting in the bypass becoming as congested as the local streets. On the contrary, a bypass is intended to avoid such local street congestion. Gas stations, shopping centers, along with various other businesses are often built alongside them. They are built in hopes of easing accessibility, while home are ideally avoided for noise reasons.

In the United States, the Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 established minimum requirements that must be met when a state issues a commercial driver's license CDL. It specifies the following types of license: - Class A CDL drivers. Drive vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater, or any combination of vehicles weighing 26,001 pounds or greater when towing a trailer weighing more than 10,000 pounds. Transports quantities of hazardous materials that require warning placards under Department of Public Safety regulations. - Class A Driver License permits. Is a step in preparation for Class A drivers to become a Commercial Driver. - Class B CDL driver. Class B is designed to transport 16 or more passengers (including driver) or more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation. This includes, but is not limited to, tow trucks, tractor trailers, and buses.

As of January 1, 2000, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) was established as its own separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation. This came about under the "Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999". The FMCSA is based in Washington, D.C., employing more than 1,000 people throughout all 50 States, including in the District of Columbia. Their staff dedicates themselves to the improvement of safety among commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and to saving lives.

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period. At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.   The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty to be used for meals and rest breaks. This meant that the weekly max was limited to 60 hours over 7 days (non-daily drivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

Advocation for better transportation began historically in the late 1870s of the United States. This is when the Good Roads Movement first occurred, lasting all the way throughout the 1920s. Bicyclist leaders advocated for improved roads. Their acts led to the turning of local agitation into the national political movement it became.

As the American Interstate Highway System began to expand in the 1950's, the trucking industry began to take over a large market share. That is, a large share of the transportation of goods throughout the country. Before this era, trains had been relied on to transport the bulk of the goods cross country or state to state. The Interstate Highway System was influential as it allows for merchandise to travel door to door with ease. Since then, truckload carriers have taken advantage of the interstate system, especially when performing a long distance move. Typically, they bring the merchandise from one distribution center of the country to another part of the country. The increase in truckload freight transportation has reduced the time it takes to transport the goods. Whether the freight was manufactured or produced for the different areas internationally, the time it takes to transport goods has decreased dramatically.  

Implemented in 2014, the National Registry, requires all Medical Examiners (ME) who conduct physical examinations and issue medical certifications for interstate CMV drivers to complete training on FMCSA’s physical qualification standards, must pass a certification test. This is to demonstrate competence through periodic training and testing. CMV drivers whose medical certifications expire must use MEs on the National Registry for their examinations. FMCSA has reached its goal of at least 40,000 certified MEs signing onto the registry. All this means is that drivers or movers can now find certified medical examiners throughout the country who can perform their medical exam. FMCSA is preparing to issue a follow-on “National Registry 2” rule stating new requirements. In this case, MEs are to submit medical certificate information on a daily basis. These daily updates are sent to the FMCSA, which will then be sent to the states electronically. This process will dramatically decrease the chance of drivers falsifying medical cards.

The American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) was organized and founded on December 12, 1914. On November 13, 1973, the name was altered to the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. This slight change in name reflects a broadened scope of attention towards all modes of transportation. Despite the implications of the name change, most of the activities it is involved in still gravitate towards highways.

Business routes generally follow the original routing of the numbered route through a city or town. Beginning in the 1930s and lasting thru the 1970s was an era marking a peak in large-scale highway construction in the United States. U.S. Highways and Interstates were typically built in particular phases. Their first phase of development began with the numbered route carrying traffic through the center of a city or town. The second phase involved the construction of bypasses around the central business districts of the towns they began. As bypass construction continued, original parts of routes that had once passed straight thru a city would often become a "business route".

Words have always had a different meaning or have been used interchangeably with others across all cultures. In the United States, Canada, and the Philippines the word "truck" is mostly reserved for larger vehicles. Although in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, the word "truck" is generally reserved for large vehicles. In Australia and New Zealand, a pickup truck is usually called a ute, short for "utility". While over in South Africa it is called a bakkie (Afrikaans: "small open container"). The United Kingdom, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Ireland, and Hong Kong use the "lorry" instead of truck, but only for medium and heavy types.

In today's society, there are rules and regulations everywhere you go, the same goes for commercial vehicles. The federal government has strict regulations that must be met, such as how many hours a driver may be on the clock. For example, 11 hours driving /14 hours on-duty followed by 10 hours off, with a max of 70 hours/8 days or 60 hours/7 days. They can also set rules deciding how much rest and sleep time is required, however, these are only a couple of regulations set. Any violations are often subject to harsh penalties. In some cases, there are instruments to track each driver's hours, which are becoming more necessary.

The Department of Transportation (DOT) is the most common government agency that is devoted to transportation in the United States. The DOT is the largest United States agency with the sole purpose of overseeing interstate travel and issue's USDOT Number filing to new carriers. The U.S., Canadian provinces, and many other local agencies have a similar organization in place. This way they can provide enforcement through DOT officers within their respective jurisdictions.