CHEAP MOVERS IN CHULA VISTA CA

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Owning up to its Spanish name origins - beautiful view - Chula Vista is located in the South Bay region of San Diego County, between the foothills of the Jamul and San Ysidro Mountains (including Lower Otay Reservoir ) and San Diego Bay on its east and west extremes, and the Sweetwater River and Otay River at its north and south extremes. In South Bay, Chula Vista has a large footprint and, aside from South San Diego , it is the largest geographic entity in the region.
According to the United States Census Bureau , the city covers an area of 52.1 square miles (135 km 2 ), 49.6 square miles (128 km 2 ) of it land, and 2.5 square miles (6.5 km 2 ) or 4.73% of it water.
Did You Know

QuestionA boat trailer is a trailer designed to launch, retrieve, carry and sometimes store boats.

QuestionAs we know in the trucking industry, some trailers are part of large trucks, which we call semi-trailer trucks for transportation of cargo.Trailers may alsobe usedin a personal manner as well, whether for personal or small business purposes.

QuestionWithin the world of transportation, bypass routes are often very controversial.This ismostlydue to the fact that theyrequirethe building of a road carrying heavy traffic where no road existed before.This has created conflict among society thus creating a divergence between those in support of bypasses and those whoare opposed. Supporters believe they reduce congestion in built up areas. Those in opposition do not believe in developing (often rural) undeveloped land.In addition, the cities thatare bypassedmay also oppose such a project as reduced traffic may, in turn, reduce and damage business.

Question

In 1938, the now-eliminated Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) enforced the first Hours of Service (HOS) rules. Drivers became limited to 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period.At this time, work included loading, unloading, driving, handling freight, preparing reports, preparing vehicles for service, or performing any other duty in relation to the transportation of passengers or property.
The ICC intended for the 3-hour difference between 12 hours of work and 15 hours on-duty tobe usedfor meals and rest breaks.This meant that the weekly maxwas limitedto 60 hours over 7 days (non-dailydrivers), or 70 hours over 8 days (daily drivers). With these rules in place, it allowed 12 hours of work within a 15-hour period, 9 hours of rest, with 3 hours for breaks within a 24-hour day.

QuestionBusiness routes generally follow the original routing of the numbered route through a city or town.Beginning in the 1930s and lasting thru the 1970s was an era marking a peak in large-scale highway construction in the United States. U.S. Highways and Interstates weretypicallybuilt in particular phases.Their first phase of development began with the numbered route carrying traffic through the center of a city or town.The second phase involved the construction of bypasses around the central business districts of the towns they began.As bypass construction continued, original parts of routes that had once passed straight thru a city would often become a "business route".

QuestionThe 1950's were quite different than the years to come.They were more likely tobe considered"Knights of the Road", if you will, for helping stranded travelers.In these times truck driverswere enviedandwere viewedas an opposition to the book "The Organization Man".Bestseller in 1956, author William H. Whyte's novel describes "the man in the gray flannel suit", who sat in an office every day.He's describing a typical office style job that is very structured with managers watching over everyone. Truck drivers represented the opposite of all these concepts. Popular trucking songs glorified the life of drivers as independent "wanderers".Yet, there were attempts to bring back the factory style efficiency, such as using tachnographs. Although most attempts resulted in little success. Driversroutinelysabotaged and discovered new ways to falsify the machine's records.