Jacobson Transfer

USDOT # 2644560
PUC # 167082
P O Box 1549
Burlingame, CA 94011
Burlingame
California
Contact Phone:
Additional Phone: (415) 342-0071
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Movers were timely and cordial. exceptionally cautious when moving. generally speaking: exceptionally respectful, proficient, and sensibly estimated.

Did You Know

QuestionThe public idea of the trucking industry in the United States popular culture has gone through many transformations.However, images of the masculine side of trucking are a common theme throughout time.The 1940's first made truckers popular, with their songs and movies about truck drivers. Then in the 1950's theywere depictedas heroes of the road, living a life of freedom on the open road.Trucking culture peaked in the 1970's as theywere glorifiedas modern days cowboys, outlaws, and rebels. Since then the portrayal has come with a more negative connotation as we see in the 1990's.Unfortunately, the depiction of truck drivers went from such a positive depiction to that of troubled serial killers.

QuestionThroughout the United States, bypass routes are a special type of route mostcommonlyused on an alternative routing of a highway around a town.Specificallywhen the main route of the highway goes through the town.Originally, these routeswere designatedas "truck routes" as a means to divert trucking traffic away from towns.However, this name was later changed by AASHTO in 1959 to what we now call a "bypass".Many "truck routes" continue to remain regardless that the mainline of the highway prohibits trucks.

QuestionThe feature film "Joy Ride" premiered in 2001, portraying the story of two college-age brothers who by a CB radio while taking a road trip.Although the plot seems lighthearted, it takes a quick turn after one of the brothers attempts a prank on an unknown truck driver. They soon find out the dangerous intentions of this killer driver, who is set on getting his revenge. Seven years later in 2008 the sequel "Joy Ride 2: Dead Ahead" came out on DVD only.Similar toits predecessor, the plot involves another murdering truck driver, a.k.a "Rusty Nail". Heessentiallyplays psychological mind games with a young couple on a road trip.

QuestionThe Federal-Aid Highway Amendments of 1974 established a federalmaximum gross vehicle weight of 80,000 pounds (36,000 kg).It also introduced a sliding scale of truck weight-to-length ratios based on the bridge formula. Although, they did not establish a federalminimumweight limit.By failing to establish a federal regulation, six contiguous in the Mississippi Valley rebelled.Becoming known as the "barrier state", they refused to increase their Interstate weight limits to 80,000 pounds.Due to this, the trucking industry faced a barrier to efficient cross-country interstate commerce.

Question

The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry.There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine.Improvement in transmissions is yet another source,justlike the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.
The first state weight limits for truckswere determinedand put in place in 1913.Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads.As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and amaximumspeed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks tomostlyurban areas.