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Gilmore is located in northern Crittenden County at 35°24′40″N 90°16′39″W  /  35.41111°N 90.27750°W  / 35.41111; -90.27750 (35.411229, -90.277528). It is bordered to the south by the city of Turrell . U.S. Routes 61 and 63 (future Interstate 555 ) pass west of the center of town, leading northwest 44 miles (71 km) to Jonesboro and south 20 miles (32 km) via Interstate 55 to West Memphis .
According to the United States Census Bureau , Gilmore has a total area of 0.23 square miles (0.6 km 2 ), all land.
Did You Know

QuestionDuring the latter part of the 20th century, we saw a decline of the trucking culture.Coinciding with this decline was a decline of the image of truck drivers, as they becamenegativelystigmatized.As a result of such negativity, it makes sense that truck drivers werefrequentlyportrayed as the "bad guy(s)" in movies.

Question“Writer-director James Mottern said he was influenced by nuanced, beloved movies of the 1970s such as "The Last Detail" and "Five Easy Pieces." Mottern said his female trucker character began with a woman he saw at a Southern California truck stop — a "beautiful woman, bleach blonde ... skin tanned to leather walked like a Teamster, blue eyes.” - Paul Brownfield


In the United States, commercial truck classificationis fixed byeach vehicle's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). There are 8 commercial truck classes, ranging between 1 and 8.Trucks are also classified in a more broad way by the DOT's Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The FHWA groups them together, determining classes 1-3 as light duty, 4-6 as medium duty, and 7-8 as heavy duty.The United States Environmental Protection Agency has its own separate system of emission classifications for commercial trucks.Similarly, the United States Census Bureau had assigned classifications of its own in its now-discontinued Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS,formerlyknown as the Truck Inventory and Use Survey).


Although there are exceptions, city routes areinterestinglymost often found in the Midwestern area of the United States. Though theyessentiallyserve the same purpose as business routes, they are different. They feature "CITY" signs as opposed to "BUSINESS" signs above or below route shields. Many of these city routes are becoming irrelevant for today's transportation. Due to this, they are being eliminated in favor of the business route designation.

QuestionBusiness routes generally follow the original routing of the numbered route through a city or town.Beginning in the 1930s and lasting thru the 1970s was an era marking a peak in large-scale highway construction in the United States. U.S. Highways and Interstates weretypicallybuilt in particular phases.Their first phase of development began with the numbered route carrying traffic through the center of a city or town.The second phase involved the construction of bypasses around the central business districts of the towns they began.As bypass construction continued, original parts of routes that had once passed straight thru a city would often become a "business route".


The rise of technological development gave rise to the modern trucking industry.There a few factors supporting this spike in the industry such as the advent of the gas-powered internal combustion engine.Improvement in transmissions is yet another source,justlike the move away from chain drives to gear drives. And of course the development of the tractor/semi-trailer combination.
The first state weight limits for truckswere determinedand put in place in 1913.Only four states limited truck weights, from a low of 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) in Maine to a high of 28,000 pounds (13,000 kg) in Massachusetts. The intention of these laws was to protect the earth and gravel-surfaced roads. In this case, particular damages due to the iron and solid rubber wheels of early trucks. By 1914 there were almost 100,000 trucks on America's roads.As a result of solid tires, poor rural roads, and amaximumspeed of 15 miles per hour (24km/h) continued to limit the use of these trucks tomostlyurban areas.