Ace Relocation Systems Phoenix

USDOT # 125550
1740 S 40th Ave Ste 100
Phoenix, AZ 85009
Phoenix
Arizona
Contact Phone: (877) 611-3534
Additional Phone: (602) 269-3534
Company Site: www.acerelocation.com

Moving with Ace Relocation Systems Phoenix

ACE is a family owned and operated moving company that began in 1968 and has grown from one location with a handful of employees to nine nationwide locations. We have become the third largest Agent of Atlas Van Lines, the second-largest van line in the U.S.


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Your Ace Relocation Systems Phoenix Reviews

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Our office expected to move down the road, and we called Ace on a referral from one of our contacts.

Larry came and gave us a Not To Exceed cite.

The movers appeared on time. They were amicable and proficient.

Nothing lost or broken.

It was justified, despite all the trouble to us, and we would suggest their administrations.

Larry Buckle, from Ace Relocation, has moved me a few times, yet this last time he went well beyond. The end of my home was postponed a few times, at last I got a 2 day notification of shutting. Larry could get me moved (with the assistance of my most loved movers, Ozzie and Jimmy). It was spectacular! I adore these folks! Much thanks to you to such an extent.

Did You Know

Question“Country music scholar Bill Malone has gone so far as to say that trucking songs account for the largest component of work songs in the country music catalog. For a style of music that has, since its commercial inception in the 1920s, drawn attention to the coal man, the steel drivin’ man, the railroad worker, and the cowboy, this certainly speaks volumes about the cultural attraction of the trucker in the American popular consciousness.” — Shane Hamilton

QuestionThe year 1611 marked an important time for trucks, as that is when the word originated. The usage of "truck" referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. Further extending its usage in 1771, it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads. In 1916 it became shortened, calling it a "motor truck".While since the 1930's its expanded application goes as faras tosay "motor-powered load carrier".

QuestionA semi-trailer is almost exactly what it sounds like, it is a trailer without a front axle.Proportionally, its weightis supported bytwo factors. The weight falls upon a road tractor or by a detachable front axle assembly, known as a dolly. Generally, a semi-traileris equippedwith legs, known in the industry as "landing gear". This means it canbe loweredto support it when itis uncoupled. In the United States, a trailer may not exceed a length of 57 ft (17.37 m) on interstate highways.However, it is possible to link two smaller trailers together to reach a length of 63 ft (19.20 m).

QuestionThe United States' Interstate Highway System is full of bypasses and loops with the designation of a three-digit number.Usually beginning with an even digit, it is important to note that this pattern ishighlyinconsistent. For example, in Des Moines, Iowa the genuine bypass is the main route.Morespecifically, it is Interstate 35 and Interstate 80, with the loop into downtown Des Moines being Interstate 235. As itis illustratedin this example, they do not alwaysconsistentlybegin with an even number.However, the 'correct' designationis exemplifiedin Omaha, Nebraska.In Omaha, Interstate 480 traverses the downtown area, whichis bypassed byInterstate 80, Interstate 680, and Interstate 95. Interstate 95 then in turn goes through Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Furthermore, Interstate 295 is the bypass around Philadelphia, which leads into New Jersey.Although this can all be rather confusing, it is most important to understand the Interstate Highway System and the role bypasses play.

QuestionThe main purpose of the HOS regulation is to prevent accidents due to driver fatigue. To do this, the number of driving hours per day, as well as the number of driving hours per week, havebeen limited.Another measure to prevent fatigue is to keep drivers on a 21 to 24-hour schedulein order tomaintain a natural sleep/wake cycle. Drivers must take a dailyminimumperiod of rest andare allowedlonger "weekend" rest periods. This is in hopes to combat cumulative fatigue effects thataccrueon a weekly basis.