LONG DISTANCE MOVERS IN ANCHORAGE AK

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Anchorage is located in Southcentral Alaska . At 61 degrees north, it lies slightly farther north than Oslo , Stockholm , Helsinki and Saint Petersburg , but not as far north as Reykjavík or Murmansk . It is northeast of the Alaska Peninsula , Kodiak Island , and Cook Inlet , due north of the Kenai Peninsula , northwest of Prince William Sound and the Alaska Panhandle , and nearly due south of Mount McKinley / Denali .
The city is on a strip of coastal lowland and extends up the lower alpine slopes of the Chugach Mountains . Point Campbell, the westernmost point of Anchorage on the mainland, juts out into Cook Inlet near its northern end, at which point it splits into two arms . To the south is Turnagain Arm, a fjord that has some of the world's highest tides. Knik Arm, another tidal inlet, lies to the west and north. The Chugach Mountains on the east form a boundary to development, but not to the city limits, which encompass part of the wild alpine territory of Chugach State Park .
The city's sea coast consists mostly of treacherous mudflats . Newcomers and tourists are warned not to walk in this area because of extreme tidal changes and the very fine glacial silt . Unwary victims have walked onto the solid seeming silt revealed when the tide is out and have become stuck in the mud. The two recorded instances of this occurred in 1961 and 1988.
According to the United States Census Bureau , the municipality has a total area of 1,961.1 square miles (5,079.2 km 2 ); 1,697.2 square miles (4,395.8 km 2 ) of which is land and 263.9 square miles (683.4 km 2 ) of it is water. The total area is 13.46% water.
Boroughs and census areas adjacent to the Municipality of Anchorage are Matanuska-Susitna Borough to the north, Kenai Peninsula Borough to the south and Valdez-Cordova Census Area to the east. The Chugach National Forest , a national protected area , extends into the southern part of the municipality, near Girdwood and Portage .
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