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8 Tips for Relocating as a Single Parent

  1. Moving As A Single Parent Can Be Challenging 
  2. Plan In Advance
  3. Talk to Your Child
  4. Get Your Kids Involved
  5. Get Help
  6. Research Online
  7. Tour the New Place
  8. Make Sure Vibes are Positive
  9. Establish a Social Life for You and Your Child
  10. We're Here When You Need Us


Relocating as a Single Parent


1. Moving As A Single Parent Can Be Challenging 

Being a single parent is never easy, even if you have the most stable home life possible. Moving brings great stress to anyone and everyone. Once you add this to the already difficult daily routine of a single parent, the difficulty of the entire situation becomes overwhelmingly apparent. Thankfully, there is some way to prevent yourself from getting too caught up in the harsh process of moving as a single parent.

2. Plan in Advance

Advance planning is one of the hallmarks of a successful move as a single parent. Usually, it takes about twelve weeks to plan a move. This is enough time to sort out any issues that may hinder your move plans if they were to arise later on. During this three-month time period, you should begin to remove some unwanted items from your home. This will keep moving costs lower if you are moving cross-country, where move costs are calculated by weight. You can have a yard sale to make some extra cash off of items that still have value. Remember that, with some items, it may be cheaper to replace them than to pay for moving them. Also during this time, you should arrange a moving party for your kids, so they have the chance to say bye to their friends in a less depressing way.

3. Talk to Your Child

Children are way more consumed by emotions than adults can see. When you decide to move, you should talk about it with your children as soon as possible. They will be confused and scared if they hear it from someone else before they hear it from you. Make all of your plans known and give them the chance to speak what is on their mind. Children may react poorly to the news that they have to move and say goodbye to the life they are used to. If this is the case, then you have to make them see moving in a more positive way.

4. Get Your Kids Involved

Involving them in the moving process will allow them to have a sense of control over what is happening to them. For younger children, feeling safe and secure is very important. If your kids are old enough, let them help you with the moving process. Smaller children can help make decorations for your new house. This will also keep them busy while you are trying to pack up the old one. Older children can help you make a layout for the home, or customize their own room with paint, carpet, or special fixtures.

5. Get Help

As a parent with no help, a number of tasks you have to complete will feel endless. Moving is a very hard thing to plan for on top of an already busy daily schedule. Full service moving companies can help take most of this stress off your shoulders. If you decide to hire a professional full-service mover, make sure to place moving company costs at the forefront of your moving budget.

6. Research Online

The internet can be used to research and manage a majority of the information that goes in to planning a move. You can find moving companies with sites such as Moving Authority. You can also look for good schools near your new home, or you can research your new neighborhood’s crime rate, neighbor profiles, and more. There may also be social media accounts dedicated to events or forums in your new neighborhood.

7. Tour the New Place

If your move will take you far away from the area that your children have come to know, then you should take the time to visit the new area before the move. Spend a day looking at the new area, finding new restaurants and parks, and just getting used to your new surroundings. Having a fun day in the area with your kids will allow them to make positive associations between the new neighborhood and their own sense of feeling toward the move as a whole. Not to mention, you will be spending some quality time with your kids before the busy moving time begins.

8. Make Sure Vibes are Positive

Although it is understandable that you will be under a lot of stress, you have to spend some time ensuring that the mood of your household is kept positive. This will make it easier for everyone else in your home to keep their spirits high. As head of the household, your children will be looking to you for emotional guidance. If you have a level head during this emotionally strenuous time, your kids will more than likely follow your emotions.

9. Establish a Social Life for You and Your Child

Having to develop an all-new social life is going to be very difficult for your kids. Making new friends will allow them to become more acclimated in their environment. You don’t have to wait for the move to start meeting new people. Use social media to find community groups or events where you and your kids can make friends. It is just as important for you to meet new people as it is them. You can benefit from having a fresh support team as much as your kids can during this tough time of change.

10. We're Here When You Need Us

As always, Moving Authority is here to help you with all your moving needs. With Moving Authority, you can find an expert mover in your area, get an estimate, and read real reviews, all in one place. For single parents with an already-packed schedule, this can be a real lifesaver. Don't let yourself be a victim to surprises!

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